# Title Days Time Location Instructor
2A World History (Prehistory to 1000 CE)

This course surveys the early cultural, social, economic, and political development of Africa, the Americas, Asia, the Mediterranean, and Oceania, from prehistory to 1000 CE.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture and Thought
European Traditions
Writing

MW 3:30-4:45 IV THEA Kegerreis  
2C World History (1700CE-Present)

Survey of the peoples, cultures, and social, economic, and political systems that have characterized the world’s major civilizations in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Oceania. 1700 CE to present.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture and Thought
European Traditions
Writing

TR 11:00-12:15 TD-W 1701 Marcuse  
2CH World History – Honors

Discussion section led by the instructor, provided for students in the honors program. Students receive one unit for this honors seminar (2CH) in addition to four units for HIST 2C, to be taken concurrently.

W 10:00-10:50 HSSB 4041 Marcuse  
5 The History of the Present

Provides essential historical context for understanding major issues and developments in contemporary life; topics vary each year. Coverage ranges from the local to the global, and encompasses current events in politics, economics, social relations, welfare, science, religion, and popular culture.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area D: Social Science
Writing

MW 2:00-3:15 GIRV 1004 O'Connor  
9 Historical Investigations: Methods and Skills

Through studying a particular topic in history, students gain insight into historical methods and skills. Course designed for freshmen and sophomore history majors or prospective majors. Others may enroll by permission of instructor. Topics vary by quarter and instructor.

The U.S-Mexico border is over two thousand miles long and ranks among the longest borders in the world. Understanding the formation of communities that facilitate border crossings and cultural interactions between these two nations is now more important than ever.

The U.S.- Mexico borderlands have been associated with violence, family separations, drug smuggling, and heavy militarization. It is difficult to imagine that during the second half of the nineteenth century the border was just a “line in the sand” where people crossed back and forth without immigration restrictions. This freshman seminar will examine the current views and perceptions about the border as well as the broader history and experiences of border people. We will begin by first examining the challenges of the present day border, the impact of NAFTA, and the war on drugs. We will then move to examine how scholars and politicians address the border and the legacy of colonialism.

 

M 12:00-2:50 HSSB 4080 Castillo-Munoz  
11A History of America’s Racial and Ethnic Minorities

Age of Conquest History of America’s racial and ethnic minorities focusing on Native American, African American, Mexican American, Asian American, and European immigrant men and women. Includes a broad range of historical situations to determine specific meanings in the evolution of a distinct multiracial and ethnic American experience.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area D: Social Science
American History & Institutions
Writing and Ethnicity

MW 8:00-9:15am ARTS 1356 Garcia, Ph.D.  
17A The American People (Colonial through Jacksonian Era)

Colonial through Jacksonian era. A survey of the leading issues in American life from colonial times to the present. The course focuses on politics, cultural development, social conflict, economic life, foreign policy, and influential ideas. Features discussion sections.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area D: Social Science
American History & Institutions
Writing

MWF 11:00-11:50 MUSIC LLCH Warkentin  
20 Science, Technology, and Medicine in Modern Society

Explores how science, technology and/or medicine have helped shape modern societies (roughly 1850-present). Themes include formation of scientific and technical communities, the interactions of science with political and popular culture, and the social context of knowledge production.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture and Thought

MWF 8:00-8:50 LSB 1001 McCray  
46 Survey of Middle Eastern History

Course themes include rise of Islam, development of Islamic civilization, the western impact, and current struggles and conflicts.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture and Thought
World Cultures
Writing

TR 12:30-1:45 BUCH 1930 Sabra  
49A Survey of African History (Prehistory-1800 CE)

An introduction to the history of Africa from prehistory to the 1800 CE. Course themes include: organization of production, state formation, Africa and the world economy, colonialism, resistance, and power and identities in African societies.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture and Thought
World Cultures
Writing

TR 9:30-10:45 CHEM 1171 Chikowero  
107C The Darwinian Revolution and Modern Biology

Examines the social and scientific impacts of evolutionary synthesis, the birth of ecology, and molecular biology. Focus is on America and Western Europe.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture and Thought

TR 2:00-3:15 ARTS 1353 Aronova  
108W Wildlife in America

Explores the turbulent, contested, and colorful history of human interactions with wild animals in North America from the Pleistocene to the present. Readings will explore historical changes in science, politics, law, management, and cultural ideas about nature.

Same course as ENV S 108W

TR 3:30-4:45 TD-W 2600 Martin  
115A The Worlds of Medieval Italy

Explores the rich multicultural worlds of medieval Italy, 1000-1300: the Greek south and Muslim Sicily; Norman military conquest and their extraordinary multi-ethnic aristocratic courts; the commercial revolution and the fluid society of the towns; papal monarchy and religious reactions: saints and heretics; the brutal factional wars of the thirteenth century; popular stories and poetry. The course ends with Dante’s Inferno.

MW 9:30-10:45 ARTS 1349 Lansing  
121B Late Medieval and Renaissance Europ, 1348 – 1550

The history of northern Europe from the black death through 1550. Topics include: social disorders, warfare, intellectual and religious culture, changes in northern Europe prompted by spreading Renaissance ideas, explorations of the “New World” and religious dispute.

MW 2:00-3:15 ARTS 1349 Bernstein  
125 Medieval Medicine: The Discourse and Practices of Medicine in the Middle Ages

Explores medical theory and practice in Western Europe and the Islamic World from the sixth to the sixteenth centuries. Medieval understandings of health, disease and how the body functioned are examined, along with strategies employed to combat injuries and illnesses.

TR 11:00-12:15 ARTS 1356 Blumenthal  
129A Europe in the Seventeenth Century

Economic, social, political, and intellectual history of Europe from 1610 to 1648.

MW 2:00-3:15 HSSB 4020 Sonnino  
140A Early Modern Britain

A history of England from the late Middle Ages to the eighteenth century.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Writing

MW 3:30-4:45 ARTS 1353 McGee  
146 History of the Modern Middle East

Through a critical engagement with colonialism, nationalism, and modernity this course explores the social, economic, political, and cultural histories of the Middle East from 1750 to the present.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
World Cultures

MW 9:30-10:45 TD-W 1701 Seikaly  
146BQ Readings Seminar in the Body and Revolution in Middle East History

How does the body become a political symbol in various moments of revolt and uprising? What can these experiences and representations tell us about the very possibility of change? What can it reveal about political economy, sex, gender, torture and brutality? This course seeks to answer these questions through a study of the histories of the body and revolution in the Middle East.

T 9:00-11:50 HSSB 4041 Seikaly  
151CU History of Cuba

A history of Cuba from the colonial era to the present, with an emphasis on the social and political processes of the 19th to 21st centuries.

MW 5:00-6:15PM ARTS 1353 Méndez Gastelumendi  
159B Women in American History, 1800-1900

Social history of women in America from 1800 to 1900. Changing marriage, reproduction and work patterns, and cultural values about the female role. Attention to racial, class and ethnic differences. Analysis of feminist thought and the several women’s movements.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area D: Social Science
American History and Institutions
Writing

MWF 11:00-11:50 ARTS 1353 Case  
161B Colonial and Revolutionary America (mid-1700s to 1800)

A social and political history of colonial and revolutionary America from the mid-eighteenth century to 1800, with emphasis on the interaction of Native Americans, Europeans, and African Americans. The course will combine lectures with discussion of both primary and secondary sources.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area D: Social Science
American History and Institutions
Ethnicity

TR 11:00-12:15 HSSB 4020 Plane  
161R Undergraduate Research Seminar in Early American History

Students will conduct historical research in early American history in a seminar context. An original and substantial research paper is required.

M 9:00-11:50 HSSB 4020 Plane  
168A History of the Chicanos

The history of the Chicanos, 1821 to the present; traces the social-cultural lifeline of the Mexicans who have lived north of Mexico.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area D: Social Science
American History and Institutions
Ethnicity

MW 3:30-4:45 ARTS 1349 Castillo-Munoz  
173T American Environmental History [cross listed – ENVS 173]

Traces the history of American attitudes and behavior toward nature. Focus on wilderness, the conservation movement, and modern forms of environmentalism.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
American History and Institutions

MWF 11:00-11:50 BUCH 1910 Graves  
175B American Cultural History

A study of dominant and alternative representations of American values and identity in high and popular culture.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area D: Social Science
American History and Institutions

TR 11:00-12:15 ARTS 1353 Jacobson  
175R Undergraduate Research Seminar in American Consumer Culture

Research seminar that examines the history of consumption and consumer cultures in the United States. Students will conduct historical research in a seminar context, using both primary and secondary sources, to produce an original research paper.

F 9:00-11:50 HSSB 4041 Jacobson  
185A Qing Empire

The Qing period saw the doubling of China’s territory, the enormous population growth, and the many encounters with the West. We will examine the politics, cultures, social norms, and different peoples, with a focus on the problem of modernization.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture & Thought
World Cultures
Writing

MW 5:00-6:15PM SH 1431 Zheng  
187B Modern Japan

A survey of Japanese history from the early nineteenth century until World War II, in an effort to explain how, and at what price, Japan became the first successful modernizer in the non-western world.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture and Thought
World Cultures
Writing

TR 3:30-4:45 ARTS 1349 Bovbjerg  
187R Undergraduate Research Seminar in Japanese History

A research seminar on Japanese History. Course culminates in a 10-20 page research paper. Topics vary by quarter.

W 1:00-3:50 GIRV 2110 Bovbjerg  
193F Food in World History 

Explores the cultural, economic, and geopolitical roles of food and drink in world history. Topics include: trade, production, and consumption; global food chains; morality and food reform; identities and body image; scarcity, food scares, and food security.

TR 2:00-3:15 TD-W 1701 Rappaport  
194AH Senior Honors Seminar

Students taking part in departmental honors program will write a senior thesis on a research topic of suitable depth under close supervision of faculty mentors.

T 1:00-3:50 HSSB 4020 Bernstein  
197IV Special Topics-Isla Vista Workers and Students in Historical and Sociological Perspective

This course is centered on a survey of Isla Vista residents, both students and workers there, that will be planned, conducted, and analyzed by those enrolled in History 197IV. Background readings and lectures, by both instructor and guest lecturers, will help prepare students for this intensive study of a local community. Among the topics that will be discussed in the course are: wages and benefits of student and non-student residents, hours of work, levels of debt, kinds of occupations, impact on their educational experience or prospects for job advancement, ethnicity, gender, and dependents of those studied, and potential impact of new laws governing minimum wages, sick leave, family leave, and organizing rights on Isla Vista.

F 10:00am-12:50pm HSSB 4020 Salvador Rangel
201C Advanced Historical Literature: Comparative

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. (Usually offered quarterly.)

T 12:00-2:50 HSSB 4041 Chikowero  
201E Advanced Historical Literature: Europe

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. (Usually offered quarterly.)

W 1:00-3:50 HSSB 4080 Lansing  
201ME Advanced Historical Literature: Middle East

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. ME. Middle East.

W 2:00-4:50PM HSSB 4041 Sabra  
201S Topics in the History of Science

Intensive study of specific problems in the history of science. Topics vary from year to year, and students may therefore repeat the course for credit.

M 10:00-12:50 HSSB 4041 Aronova  
202 Historical Methods

A general introduction to selected historiographical issues and historical methods. (F)

W 5:00-7:50PM HSSB 4041 Sonnino  
215A Seminar in Medieval History

A two-quarter course.

R 1:00-3:50PM HSSB 4041 Farmer  
218A Colloquium in Policy History

Readings in the fundamentals of policy history including selections in social theory, governance, political economy, knowledge production, political culture and comparative analysis. Offered as a foundations course for students with a broad range of more specialized policy interests.

T 3:00-5:50PM HSSB 4041 O'Connor  
223A Seminar in Modern European History

A research seminar in selected topics in the history of Europe, 1815 to the present.

M 1:00-3:50 HSSB 4041 Edgar  
250C Foundations of Latin American History

Seminar introduces the important issues, themes, and literature in Latin American history during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

T 6:00-8:50PM HSSB 4041 Méndez Gastelumendi  
287J Reinventing “Japan” Colloquium
W 4:00-5:30pm HSSB 4020 Saltzman-Li
291 Theoretical Perspectives on War, Nationalism, Political Violence, and State-Making

This three-quarter colloquium will discuss key works on war, political violence, nationalism, and state-making from an interdisciplinary perspective and a wide geographical and chronological scope. Readings will include both classic and more recent works, and may vary each year. The colloquium will also encourage and support student research on these areas. Students will be evaluated by their class participation and written work, just as in a regular graduate seminar The colloquium will occasionally invite guest speakers.

TBD TBD TBD Méndez Gastelumendi  
292A Foundations of U.S. History to 1846

A colloquium introducing the important issues, themes, and literature in the history of the United States, from colonial origins to 1846. Historiographical in nature, the course assumes a basic familiarity with the period.

M 4:00-6:50PM HSSB 4041 Brooks  
294 Colloquium in Work, Labor, and Political Economy

Hosts leading scholars of the nineteenth- and twentieth-century U.S. whose work touches upon the history and character of work, employment, labor, poverty, race, ethnicity, political economy, and public policy. The colloquium meets three to four times per quarter.

F 1:00-3:50pm HSSB 4041 Lichtenstein  
295 Workshop in Environmental History

Writing workshop, professionalization seminar, and guest lecture series for graduate students working in area of environmental history. Meets monthly throughout the academic year, and includes occasional campus events and field trips.

R 6:00-8:50pm BREN 4316 Alagona  
295TS Workshop in the History of Technology & Science

Writing/reading workshop, professionalization seminar, and guest lecture series for graduate students working in area of history of science/technology. Meets monthly throughout the academic year.

Note: course meets only on 1/15, 2/19, and 3/11.

T 4:00pm-7:00pm HSSB 6056 Aronova