# Title Days Time Location Instructor
2C WORLD HISTORY (1700 CE TO PRESENT)

Survey of the peoples, cultures, and social, economic, and political systems that have characterized the world’s major civilizations in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Oceania from 1700 to present. Satisfies General Education Requirements: Area E: Culture and Thought, European Traditions, and Writing

M/W 2:00-3:15pm IV THEATER 1 Bergstrom  
4B Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Survey of the history of Europe in the Medieval and Early Modern periods, 800-1700. Discusses the major social, political, religious, and cultural characteristics and developments of the period, as well as key interactions between Europe and other parts of the world. Weekly discussion sections are an important feature of this course, enabling students to develop and expand upon material presented during the lecture hour.

Satisfies General Education Requirements: Area E: Culture and Thought, European Traditions, and Writing

M/W 9:30-10:45am HFH 1104 Bernstein  
4C MODERN EUROPE

Survey of the history of Modern Europe, 1650-present. Discusses the major social, political, religious, and cultural characteristics and developments of the period, as well as key interactions between Europe and other parts of the world. Weekly discussion sections are an important feature of this course, enabling students to develop and expand upon material presented during the lecture hour.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture and Thought
European Traditions
Writing

T/R 3:30-4:45pm IV THEATER 1 Edgar  
17C THE AMERICAN PEOPLE (WWI-PRESENT)

A survey of the leading issues in American life from World War I to the present. The course focuses on politics, cultural development, social conflict, economic life, foreign policy, and influential ideas. Features discussion sections.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area D: Social Science
American History and Institutions
Writing

T/R 2:00-3:15pm IV THEATER 1 Yaqub  
46MI MODERN IRAN

Modern Iranian history from the 1906 Constitutional Revolution to the 1979 Islamic Revolution and the post- revolutionary years. Shi’i Islam, the rise of nationalism, the quest for modernization, democracy and authoritarianism, and imperialism and politics of oil.

Same course as RG ST 81

T/R 12:30-1:45pm PSYCH 1924 Afary
49C African History since 1945

1945 to present. History 49-A- B-C is a general survey course designed to introduce students to major themes in African history. The course focuses on colonialism and decolonization, nationalism and self-liberation, development and neocolonialism, Cold War contexts, as well as African experiences of independence and the everyday in our contemporary, global world. Weekly discussion sections are an important feature of this course, enabling students to develop and expand upon material presented during lecture.

Same course as Black Studies 49C

T/R 5:00-6:15pm NH 1006 Chikowero  
56 Introduction to Mexican History

An introduction to the basic issues and themes of Mexican history, from the pre-Hispanic era to the present.

M/W 3:30-4:45pm LSB 1001 Castillo-Muñoz  
101G COMPARATIVE HISTORIES OF SAME-SEX PRACTICES AND GENDER VARIANCE

Exploration of same-sex behavior in ancient Greek, pre-modern Oceania, medieval Europe, modern Africa, and North America. Introduction to the theoretical questions in the study of sexuality and how scholars have used these tools.

W/F 9:30-10:45am TD-W 2600 Henderson  
102BF Black Freedom, African Revolutionaries
This course examines the ways that African political cultures and enslaved black aspirations for freedom came together to help shape the Modern World. Black people brought more than brute labor to the table; they brought revolutionary ideas, beliefs, and practices that profoundly impacted the emergence of American societies.
T/R 3:30-4:45pm GIRV 1116 Ware  
105CW SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY IN THE COLD WAR

Examines history of science and technology during the Cold War, with primary focus on the United States. Topics examined include: science/state relationship, arms race, the military-industrial-academic complex, Big Science, government secrecy, McCarthyism, the space race, environmentalism.

M/W 2:00-3:15pm GIRV 1116 Aronova  
108W Wildlife in America

Explores the turbulent, contested, and colorful history of human interactions with wild animals in North America from the Pleistocene to the present. Readings will explore historical changes in science, politics, law, management, and cultural ideas about nature.

Same course as ENV S 108W

T/R 12:30-1:45pm HSSB 1173 Alagona  
111R Undergraduate Research Seminar in Greek History

Undergraduate research seminar focusing on ancient Greece and West Asia. Students select research topic in consultation with instructor, conduct individual research, write multiple paper drafts, and submit final research paper of 15-20 pages

M 2:00-4:50 PM HSSB 4020 Lee  
117C WOMEN, THE FAMILY, AND SEXUALITY IN THE MIDDLE AGES

Family structure; perceptions and ideals of intimate and familial relations; status, perceptions, and experiences of women in Western Europe c. 400-1400 A.D. Special attention on social, political, and religious contexts.

Enrollment Comments: Same course as Feminist Studies 117C and Medieval Studies 100A.
T/R 3:30-4:45pm 387 1015 Farmer  
121Q Cultures of Renaissance Europe, 1450-1650

Through original texts and historical commentary, seminar explores individual lived experiences, as manifested through issues of popular and elite cultures, witchcraft, gender relations, nobility, and law.

W 1:00-3:50pm HSSB 4020 Bouley  
122 Reformation and Counter-Reformation

The Reformation and the Counter-Reformation in Europe. Through a close analysis of selected primary sources, students will gain a deeper knowledge of the theological, political and cultural impact of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation in a transnational perspective.

T/R 11:00am-12:15pm GIRV 1116 Bouley  
133C Twentieth Century Germany, Part II

After examining developments during the last years of World War II, this course traces the histories of East and West Germany from 1945 to unification in 1989.

T/R 11:00am-12:15pm ARTS 1353 Marcuse  
133R Undergraduate Research Seminar in German or Genocide History

Research seminar on topics in German history from 1800 to the present, or in the history of genocide.

M 2:00-4:50pm HSSB 4041 Marcuse  
140B Early Modern Britain

A history of England from the late Middle Ages to the eighteenth century.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Writing

M/W 12:30-1:45pm 387 1011 McGee  
141R Undergraduate Research Seminar in Modern British History

Research in modern British social, cultural, economic, and political history. Students will conduct historical research in a seminar context, using both primary and secondary source materials, to produce an original and substantial research paper.

R 1:00-3:50pm HSSB 4020 Henderson  
145C The Middle East III: Early Modern Empires and Transformations, 1500-1800

A survey of Middle Eastern history from the rise of the Safavid Empire in Iran and the Ottoman conquest of the Mamluk Empire until the French occupation of Egypt and the first Ottoman attempts at modernizing reform.

T/R 9:30-10:45am GIRV 1116 al-Sabbagh  
147R Undergraduate Research Seminar in African History

A seminar on a topic in African history. A research paper is required.

T 2:00-4:50pm HSSB 4041 Chikowero  
149IA Islam in Africa

Africa is the only continent with a Muslim majority. More than a quarter of the world’s Muslims live in Africa—mostly in sub-Saharan Africa. Americans tend to associate Islam with Arabs, but Africans greatly outnumber Arabs in the religion. There are more Muslims in Nigeria than in Egypt, more in Ethiopia than Iraq. 1/6th of the world’s Muslims reside in sub-Saharan Africa. How did this come to be? How has the adoption of Islam by Africans shaped their history? And, conversely, how have Africans shaped Islam? We will answer these questions by exploring 14 centuries of Islamic African history. But this is not only a history course. We will also explore Islam as a system of religious meaning by studying the teachings and writings of African

M/W 2:00-3:15pm 387 1015 Ware  
150CL Comparative Colonialism and Language

All colonial projects had to face the problem of linguistic differences. The ways in which they did so varied widely and are very revealing of their different ambitions, ideological foundations, and local circumstances. Explores the history of colonialism in the Atlantic World comparatively from the perspective of language, from the late fifteenth to the early nineteenth centuries, in the Americas, Africa, and Europe.

Recommended Preparation: HIST 9 or WRIT 109HU 

M/W 2:00-3:15pm 387 1011 Cobo  
153A Honor, Race, Gender, and Class in the Americas

Explores the intersectionality of honor, gender, race, and class during the colonial period and the nineteenth century, in the Americas, with an emphasis in Iberoamerica. Looks into the ways in which these notes, ideas, or concepts served as a metaphor for policies, rights, inclusion, and discrimination. Through the reading of secondary and primary sources, we explore ways in which women and men from different backgrounds and ethnicities negotiated, internalized and resisted hegemonic, imposed assumptions about their honor or lack of it. Lastly, we consider ways in which the sequels of these assumptions linger up to the present and shape the way we perceive one another.

T/R 2:00-3:15pm 387 1015 Laurent-Perrault  
159C WOMEN IN TWENTIETH CENTURY AMERICAN HISTORY

A continuation of History 159B to the present.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area D: Social Science
American History and Institutions
Writing

M/W/F 11:00-11:50am EMBARHALL Case  
166LB American Legal History

The history of the U.S. Supreme Court, legal thought, legal education and the legal profession since the late nineteenth century.

T/R 11:00am-12:15pm TD-W 1701 Kalman  
167Q LABOR STUDIES INTERNSHIP RESEARCH SEMINAR

Readings and assignments assist students in using historical/social science methods to develop a 20-page research paper on some aspect of their internship.

T 9:00-11:50 am HSSB 4020 Elrod  
167CB Capital and Class in 20th Century America

A survey of American workers from the turn of the century to the present period. Topics include workers and American socialism, the 1919 steel strike, the rise of the CIO, labor and the cold war, and deindustrialization and workers.

MW 5:00- 6:15pm 397 1011 Lichtenstein  
168M Middle Eastern Americans

The history of migration to the United States by Arabs, Persians, and other peoples of the Middle East; the communities they have built; their families, social, cultural, and religious lives; relationships with other Americans; and ongoing links to the Middle East.

M/W 9:30-10:45am 387 1011 Spickard  
173T American Environmental History

Traces the history of American attitudes and behavior toward nature. Focus on wilderness, the conservation movement, and modern forms of environmentalism.

T/R 5:00-6:15pm HSSB 1173 Martin
174B Wealth and Poverty in America

Changing patterns and conceptions of inequality, seventeenth century to present. Examines influence of economic transformation, race, gender, class, attitudes towards work and welfare, social movements, social knowledge, law and public policy on opportunity, income, status, and power.Divides at Civil War and World War II.

M/W 3:30-4:45pm 387 1011 Stephens  
174C Wealth and Poverty in America

Changing patterns and conceptions of inequality, seventeenth century to present. Examines influence of economic transformation, race, gender, class, attitudes towards work and welfare, social movements, social knowledge, law and public policy on opportunity, income, status, and power.Divides at Civil War and World War II.

T/R 3:30-4:45pm 387 1011 Stephens  
179B NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY, 1838 TO THE PRESENT

A lecture course on the history of the indigenous peoples of North America from Cherokee removal to the present. The course stresses native history, relations with the U.S. Government and offers American history from a native point of view.

M/W 12:30-1:45pm GIRV 2129 Black
184B History of China

Sixth to seventeenth centuries.

T/R 9:30-10:45am 387 1015 Barbieri-Low  
187S The Samurai

The samuri of Japan were a hereditary military class that evolved over a millenium. Course traces this history and clarifies the range of differences that separated samuri in each era as their roles and ideologies changed.

M/W 3:30-4:45pm TD-W 1701 Roberts  
189M South Asian Public Culture

Historical and contemporary forms of South Asian expressive and popular culture, including cinema, television, popular music, material culture, performance, and literature. Focuses on relations among popular culture, everyday life and social history in post-colonial South Asia.

T/R 2:00-3:15pm 387 1011 Chattopadhyaya  
201AM Advanced Historical Literature: America

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. AM. America.

T 3:00-5:50pm HSSB 4020 Spickard  
201C Advanced Historical Literature: Comparative

This Comparative History course on South Asia and the Indian Ocean will introduce students to the scope of historical research on the Indian Ocean World between 1600 and 1960. The course covers sources, methods, and literature from South Asia in comparison with works on Eastern and Southern Africa, the Gulf of Aden, and the Bay of Bengal. Using themes such as capital, bodies, and ideas, the course will examine how the Indian Ocean serves as historical method, the scales through which the ocean is experienced and historicized, and the role of comparison and connectivity in analyzing oceanic and territorial geographies.

W 5:00-7:50pm HSSB 3030 Chattopadhyaya  
201HS Advanced Historical Literature: History of Science

This graduate level readings seminar provides a survey of key works in the history of science. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field. Written work as prescribed by the instructor.

T 12:00-2:50pm HSSB 4020 Aronova  
201OH Advanced Historical Literature: Oral History

Readings in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduction to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor.

W 4:00-6:50pm HSSB 2252 Miescher  
201E Advanced Historical Literature

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. E. Europe.

F 12:00-2:50pm HSSB 4020 English  
201LA Advanced Historical Literature: Latin America

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. LA. Latin America.

This course explores the complexity of the experiences of enslaved and free people of African descent as well as the processes of racialization that took place in Latin America from the early sixteenth through the second half of the nineteenth centuries.  The course considers the many ways in which enslaved and free Africans and people of African descent experienced and negotiated their lot as they attempted to make claims of dignity and circumvent the imposed conditions of enslavement, colonialism, and discrimination.  The course considers the use of religion, the law, clothing, rebellion/revolution, political, and community formation as paths towards negotiation, resistance, and upward social mobility.  While exploring mostly secondary works, the course will consider the methodological challenges of researching and writing the history of people who left almost no directly written primary sources.  Students are welcome to bring their own related research and primary sources into the course.

W 1:00-3:50pm HSSB 4041 Laurent-Perrault  
215F Research Seminar in Medieval Social History

A two-quarter graduate research seminar in medieval social history.

F 9:00-11:50am HSSB 4041 Farmer  Bernstein  
221A Research Seminar in Transnational Empire

A two-quarter research seminar that explores the history of modern empire from a transnational perspective. Open to graduate students in any area field.

W 9:00-11:50am HSSB 4041 McDonald  
287J REINVENTING “JAPAN” COLLOQUIUM

This year long interdisciplinary colloquium brings together graduate students who study Japanese history and culture. It introduces current scholarship on Japan via readings, discussions and presentations by visiting scholars, UCSB scholars and graduate students. The colloquium meets bi- weekly. Students will prepare readings for discussion, write a seminar-length paper and present their paper to the colloquium once during the year.

W 4:00-5:30pm HSSB 4041 McDonald  
292C Foundations of U.S. History, 1917-Present

A colloquium introducing the important issues, themes, and literature in the history of the United States, from 1917 to the present. Historiographical in nature, the course assumes a basic familiarity with the period.

T 9:00-11:50am HSSB 4041 Yaqub  
294 COLLOQUIUM IN WORK, LABOR, AND POLITICAL ECONOMY

Hosts leading scholars of the nineteenth- and twentieth-century U.S. whose work touches upon the history and character of work, employment, labor, poverty, race, ethnicity, political economy, and public policy. The colloquium meets three to four times per quarter.

F 1:00-3:50pm HSSB 4041 Lichtenstein  
295LA Workshop on Historical and Digital Methods in Latin-American History

A year-long workshop on methods for graduate students, focused on Latin America but open to students of other fields. Involves readings, discussions, practical exercises and occasional guest lectures. Includes training in core archival research skills, such as palaeography; the use of digital tools such as online databases, reference managers, and writing software; and digital humanities methodologies such as digital mapping, database creation, text encoding and analysis, web publishing, and the digitization of archival materials. Participants prepare readings for discussion, produce seminar-length papers or small digital humanities projects, and present their results to the group. Meets bi-weekly throughout the academic year.

R 4:00-6:50pm HSSB 4041 Cobo  
295TS Workshop in the History of Science and Technology

Writing/reading workshop, professionalization seminar, and guest lecture series for graduate students working in area of history of science/technology. Meets monthly throughout the academic year.

T 3:30-5:30pm HSSB 6056 Aronova