# Title Days Time Location Instructor
2A World History

Survey of the peoples, cultures, and social, economic, and political systems that have characterized the world’s major civilizations in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Oceania from prehistory to 1000 CE.  

M/W 3:30-4:45pm IV Theater 1 Lee  
2C World History

Survey of the peoples, cultures, and social, economic, and political systems that have characterized the world’s major civilizations in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Oceania from 1700 to present.  

M/W 12:30-1:45pm IV Theater 1 Henderson  
4B Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Survey of the history of Europe in the Medieval and Early Modern periods, 800-1700. Discusses the major social, political, religious, and cultural characteristics and developments of the period, as well as key interactions between Europe and other parts of the world. Weekly discussion sections are an important feature of this course, enabling students to develop and expand upon material presented during the lecture hour.  

M/W 3:30-4:45pm ARTS 1349 Sonnino  
7 Great Issues in the History of Public Policy

Broad exploration of great issues in the history of public policy from ancient times to present, to understand basic ways in which societies make their major decisions, the shared dynamics in the process, and how varied settings affect it.  

T/R 9:30-10:45am LSB 1001 Bergstrom  
9 Historical Investigations: Methods and Skills

Through studying a particular topic in history, students gain insight into historical methods and skills. Course designed for freshmen and sophomore history majors or prospective majors. Others may enroll by permission of instructor. Topics vary by quarter and instructor.  

Fall 2021 – This course will look at various ways to interpret the Egyptian pharaoh Akhenaten, including through archaeology, inscriptions, and art history, as well as his later interpretation by poets, playwrights, Afrocentrists, Biblical scholars, and queer theorists.

T/R 9:30-10:45am GIRV 2124 Barbieri  
9 Historical Investigations: Methods and Skills

Through studying a particular topic in history, students gain insight into historical methods and skills. Course designed for freshmen and sophomore history majors or prospective majors. Others may enroll by permission of instructor. Topics vary by quarter and instructor.  

T/R 12:30-1:45pm GIRV 2124 Bergstrom  
9 Historical Investigations: Methods and Skills

Through studying a particular topic in history, students gain insight into historical methods and skills. Course designed for freshmen and sophomore history majors or prospective majors. Others may enroll by permission of instructor. Topics vary by quarter and instructor.  

T/R 11am-12:15pm Tuesdays - ONLINE, Thursdays - HSSB 4020 Arnold  
17A The American People

Colonial through Jacksonian era. A survey of the leading issues in Americanlife from colonial times to the present. The course focuses on politics, cultural development, social conflict, economic life, foreign policy, and influential ideas. Features discussion sections.  

M/W 2-3:15pm IV Theater 1 Moore  
28 Gandhi: Nonviolence, Resistance, Truth

Gandhi: revolutionary, politician, thinker. And saint? Studies the ideas and acts of the man credited with liberating India from colonial rule through nonviolent resistance. Controversial throughout his life, Gandhi continues to be fought over in India today. Emphases include: his religious persona; his intellectual contexts, both Indian and Western; nonviolence in theory and practice; Gandhi’s legacy to social justice movements in this country; and criticism from different angles. There will be movies.  

M/W 12:30-1:45pm PSYCH 1924 Elison
46B The Middle East: From the Nineteenth Century to the Present

A general introduction to the history, politics, culture, and social life of the modern Middle East. Begins with the nineteenth century Ottoman reforms known as the Tanzimat and moves on to cover capitalist consolidation, the rise of European colonialism, the state-building process, social movements, Cold War politics, and the growth of the oil industry. Pays particular attention to how twentieth century transformations shaped new modes of identification including nationalism and citizenship, feminism, sectarianism, pan-Arabism, Third Worldism, Islamism.  

M/W 2-3:15pm LSB 1001 Seikaly  
49A Survey of African History

Prehistory to c. 1800. History 49-A- B-C is a general survey course designed to introduce students to major themes in African history. The course focuses on organization of production, state formation, African civilizations and identities, science and technology, beliefs and knowledge systems, Africa’s interaction with the world economy, such as through enslavement and slave trades. Weekly discussion sections are an important feature of this course, enabling students to develop and expand upon material presented during lecture.  

T/R 2-3:15pm CHEM 1171 Chikowero  
74 Poverty, Inequality and Social Justice in Historical and Global Context

Historical and interdisciplinary perspectives on poverty and inequality globally and in the U.S., tracing structural transformations, shifting modes of thought, policy, and action, dynamics of class, racial, gender, ethnic and geographic stratification, and major theoretical debates from antiquity through the present. Course features guest lectures to introduce students to varied conceptual and methodological approaches to studying poverty and inequality, and draws on readings, discussion, writing, and related assignments to explore issues within a social justice framework. 

M/W 3:30-4:45pm LSB 1001 Kretz
115R Undergraduate Research Seminar in Medieval European History

Students will conduct historical research in a seminar context, using both primary and secondary source materials. Topics addressed: defining a research problem, identifying an original topic, conducting research, citing sources, and presenting results. Intensive writing required.  

T 9-11:50am HSSB 2252 Lansing  
115X Medieval Scandals

Explores medieval European politics and culture through a look at notorious scandals: Pope Joan, Heloise and Abelard, the persecution of the Templars, and the Fourth Crusade.  

T/R 12:30-1:45pm LSB 1001 Lansing  
118B Muslims, Christians, and Jews in Medieval Spain: Conquest, Colonization, and Coexistence

Assesses the more than seven centuries of Muslim, Christian, and Jewish coexistence (convivencia) in the Iberian peninsula, examine intercultural and interfaith relations from the time of the Visigoths (fifth century) to the expulsion of the Moriscos (Muslim converts to Christianity) in 1609.  

T/R 11am-12:15pm ARTS 1356 Blumenthal  
121D Crime and Punishment in Early Modern Europe

Examines the varying judicial systems of early modern Europe and looks at how crime and criminals were defined and treated in a social, religious, and political context. Topics will also include beggars, violence, heretics, and witches.  

M/W 2-3:15pm GIRV 1116 Bernstein  
122 Reformation and Counter-Reformation

The Reformation and the Counter-Reformation in Europe. Through a close analysis of selected primary sources, students will gain a deeper knowledge of the theological, political and cultural impact of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation in a transnational perspective. 

T/R 12:30-1:45pm GIRV 1116 Bouley  
123R Undergraduate Research Seminar in the History of Europe, 1815-Present

Research seminar in the history of Europe from 1815 to the present. Students will conduct historical research in a seminar context, using both primary and secondary source materials, to produce an original and substantial research paper. Topics addressed: defining a research problem, identifying on original topic, conducting research, citing sources, and presenting results. Intensive writing required. 

M 1-3:50pm HSSB 4020 Moak  
127F The French Revolution

The French Revolution was a globally significant historical event. The ideas of liberty and equality articulated through the storming of the Bastille and Declaration of the Rights of Man were radical and volatile, and the Revolution engendered modern notions of republicanism, democracy and citizenship. This was also, however, a period of war, violence and terror, which incited conflicts and upheaval across the world. We will explore the multiple meanings of the French Revolution, and its enduring global ramifications and legacies.  

M/W 9:30-10:45am TD-W 1701 Covo  
142AL American Legal and Constitutional History

The U.S. Supreme Court has weighed in on the nation’s most significant social questions ranging from segregation to same-sex marriage and women’s work. Designed to put these and other decisions in proper context, this course covers U.S. legal history from the founding period to the present, with special attention to the evolution of legal conceptions of property, race and gender, civil rights, and criminal justice. Students must read critically and make arguments based on evidence.  

W/F 9:30-10:45am TD-W 2600 Zipperstein  
146 History of the Modern Middle East

Through a critical engagement with colonialism, nationalism, and modernity this course explores the social, economic, political, and cultural histories of the Middle East from 1750 to the present.  

M/W 9:30-10:45am GIRV 1116 Seikaly  
159B Women in American History

Social history of women in America from 1800 to 1900. Changing marriage, reproduction and work patterns, and cultural values about the female role. Attention to racial, class and ethnic differences. Analysis of feminist thought and the several women’s movements.  

M/W/F 11:00-11:50am GIRV 1116 Case  
162B Antislavery Movements in the United States

Analyzes antislavery movements in U.S. from the Revolution to the present, with special focus on the enslaved, Black abolitionists, and transatlantic reformers.  

T/R 3:30-4:45pm GIRV 1116 Majewski  
162R Research in U.S. Antislavery

Research seminar in the history of U.S. antislavery movements from the Revolution to the present. Explores political, social, and cultural approaches.  

F 9-11:50am HSSB 4020 Majewski  
167CA History of the American Working Class, 1800-1900

A survey of the origins and formation of the American working class from the colonial period to the late nineteenth century. Topics include workers and community, the coming of the industrial order, the 1877 labor strike, and workers and the trade union movement.  

T/R 11am-12:15pm GIRV 2112 Adams  
168A History of the Chicanos

The history of the Chicanos from the indigenous/colonial past to 1900. Explores the evolving history of Mexican descent people during the Pre-Columbian, Spanish, Mexican, and the U.S. periods.

M/W 5-6:15pm Monday - Online/Wednesday - ARTS 1349 Castillo-Muñoz  
175A American Cultural History

A study of dominant and alternative representations of American values and identity in high and popular culture.  

T/R 11am-12:15pm GIRV 1116 Jacobson  
176R Undergraduate Research Seminar in the History of Drugs and Alcohol

A research seminar that explores the role of alcohol and other drugs in everyday life; why different societies have regulated certain drugs more stringently than others; and how contested moralities have shaped conflict over drug regulation and enforcement. Students will conduct historical research in a seminar context, using both primary and secondary source materials, to produce an original and substantial research paper.  

W 9-11:50am HSSB 4041 Jacobson  
184M China’s Historical Minorities

China has always been multiethnic. The nomenclature “Chinese” is a collective designation of multiple peoples who have resided in and contributed to the makeup of the “Middle Kingdom” (Chinese name for China). This class offers an introduction to China’s minority populations from the classical times through 1600s.  

M/W 3:30-4:45pm GIRV 1116 Zuo  
187A Japan Under the Tokugawa Shoguns

A survey of Japanese social and cultural history from the mid-sixteenth century to the nineteenth century. 

T/R 2-3:15pm GIRV 1116 Roberts  
193C The Early Caribbean in the Atlantic World (ca. 1500 – ca. 1850)

Analyzes the Caribbean as a site of encounters between Native Americans, Europeans and Africans in the early modern Atlantic world. Key themes include indigenous societies; imperialism and settler colonialism; capitalism, piracy and smuggling; voluntary and forced migration; plantation societies, slavery and slave resistance; cross-cultural exchanges and creolization; revolution and abolition. 

M/W 2-3:15pm GIRV 2128 Covo  
194AH Senior Honors Seminar

Students taking part in departmental honors program will write a senior thesis on a research topic of suitable depth under close supervision of faculty mentors.

W 1-3:50pm HSSB 4020 Bouley  
196JA/JB/JC Internship in Scholarly Publishing

Through this year-long internship, students work under faculty direction to produce an issue of the UCSB History Department’s Undergraduate Journal. Students meet every two weeks and gain practical experience in scholarly publishing disseminating calls for papers, soliciting undergraduate contributions, locating peer reviewers, facilitating revisions with authors, and bibliographic and copywriting work. They also gain a working knowledge of the UCSB Library’s online publication platform, which will host the journal. Students utilize various digital humanities tools – podcasts, social media, and websites – to promote the undergraduate research being published in Journal as well as host an annual showcase of scholars’ work.  

T 2-4:50pm ELLSN 2617 Henderson  
200G Historical Literature – Women, Gender, and Sexuality

A reading course in a general area of history, specifically designed to prepare M.A. candidates for their comprehensive examination fields, but also appropriate for Ph.D. students seeking broad preparation. Introduction to the sources, historiography, and general literature of the field in question.  

W 2-4:50pm HSSB 4080 Castillo-Muñoz  
201CA Advanced Historical Literature Early China

A reading course in a field of Chinese History, 2000 BCE-220 CE. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor.  

M 9-11:50am HSSB 4041 Barbieri  
201HS Advanced Historical Literature: History of Science

This graduate level readings seminar provides a survey of key works in the history of science. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field. Written work as prescribed by the instructor.  

T 10:00am-12:50pm HSSB 4041 Aronova  
202 Historical Methods

A general introduction to selected historiographical issues and historical methods.  

T 1-3:50pm HSSB 4041 Sabra  
215A Seminar in Medieval History

A two-quarter course.  

W 12-2:50pm HSSB 4041 English  
248A Graduate Research Seminar in African History

This is a two-quarter graduate seminar in histories of any part of the continent covering the 19th-20th centuries. The seminar will help students to focus their attention on closely reading and utilizing primary sources for a clearly-defined output, e.g., a dissertation chapter or a journal article. In addition to the primary materials, we will collectively assemble and read together a set of crucial books on areas of the students’ research interest. We will also invite local and outside guests to talk about their own research and lead seminars. Students earn 2 units per quarter.  

T 10:00am-12:50pm HSSB 4020 Chikowero  
253B Special Seminar in Latin American History

A two-quarter special seminar on a given topic. Students will produce a chapter-length paper or publishable article. 

W 4-6:50pm HSSB 4041 Cobo  
277A Topics in the History of Science

Research seminar selected from such topics as Babylonian astronomy, Greek science, Age of Newton, rise of modern physics, scientific instruments, nationalism/internationalism in science, science and society, sociology of science, public conceptions of science, organization and profession of science.  

M 2-4:50pm HSSB 4041 McCray  Aronova  
295GS Gender and Sexualities Colloquium

This year-long interdisciplinary colloquium brings together graduate students and UCSB scholars who study the histories of women, gender, or sexuality across time and space. It introduces students to current literature and contemporary debates through readings, discussion, and public presentations by visiting scholars, UCSB scholars, and graduate students. Participants will meet every other week. Preparation might include coordinating readings for discussion, writing a chapter/article for peer review, or presenting original research to colloquium members.  

Starting in Fall 2021 there will be space set aside for senior History Undergraduates or those completing their LGBTQ Studies Minor in Feminist Studies in the Gender and Sexualities Workshop (HIST 295 GS). Though this 2 Credit Hour Course is designed for Graduate Students who study the histories of women, gender, or sexuality across time and space, its primary purpose is to introduce students to current literature and contemporary debates through readings, discussion, and public presentations by guest scholars. Participants will meet every other week and preparation might include coordinating readings for discussion or sharing their own original research with workshop members (among other things).  If you are interested or would like to know more, please contact Jarett Henderson at jhenderson@history.ucsb.edu. You will need an add code to enroll. 

R 2-4:50pm HSSB 4041 Henderson  
295TS Workshop in the History of Technology and Science

Writing/reading workshop, professionalization seminar, and guest lecture series for graduate students working in area of history of science/technology. Meets monthly throughout the academic year. 

T 3:30-5:00pm HSSB 4080 Bouley  
295PH Colloquium in Public History

A year-long professional colloquium on major topics and new work in Public History. Leading practitioners share theory and practice of the discipline in talks, workshops and occasional field visits. Relevant reading and writing assigned. Meets three to four times per quarter.  

F 1-3:50pm HSSB 4020 Bergstrom