UCSB History Graduate Students and Alumni Win Awards and Distinctions

A whole spate of good news has come through at the end of the academic year! Congratulations to the following current and former graduate students on their accomplishments.

The community is invited to celebrate these and other achievements at the History Department Awards Ceremony on June 2.

Dr. Ryan Abrecht (PhD 2014, supervised by Beth Digeser) has just been granted tenure at the University of San Diego. Ryan teaches in the Department of History and also serves as the Director of Classical Studies at USD.
 
Nirupama Chandrasekhar has been awarded a Japan Foundation/UCSB Graduate Division Research Accelerator Award for her project, “Defiant Indigeneity in the Okinawan Tourism Industry.” The award will fund her pre-dissertation research on indigenous Okinawan movements within the tourism industry.
 
Dr. Sasha Coles, a very recent alumna, has been awarded the Mormon History Association’s Best Dissertation Prize, for her thesis “Homespun Respectability: Silk Worlds, Women’s Work, and the Making of Mormon Identity,” which she completed under the direction of Prof. Lisa Jacobson.
 
Giulia Giamboni has been awarded a Dissertation Research Grant from the Association of Slavic, Easter European, and Eurasian Studies. The fellowship will support her travel expenses for conducting the final archival research in Zadar and Rome for her dissertation, “The Politics of Charity: Political, Gendered and Material Uses of Charity in the Fourteenth-Century Eastern Mediterranean.”
 
Anthony Greco has received the Fulbright U.S. Student Study/Research Award for 2021/2022 in support of his dissertation, “Engineering Egypt: Science, Culture, and Nation in the Age of Empire.” 
 
Dr. Cody Stevens, who completed his dissertation under the direction of Prof. Nelson Lichtenstein has just taken a teaching professorship at the School of Labor and Employment Relations at Penn State.
 
Erin Trumble has won a Japan Foundation/UCSB Graduate Division Research Accelerator Award. Erin will use the award to conduct archival research in preparation for her dissertation, “Retirement and Gender in Edo Period Japan,” about the ways in which retired women and men restructured and redefined masculine and feminine behaviors.

Post last modified: May 31, 2021