FOCAL POINT Dialogues in History Keynote Lecture with Prof. Herman Bennett: “Body, Soul & Subject: A History of Difference in the Early-Modern African Atlantic”

The History Department’s Colloquium Committee warmly invites you to attend the keynote lecture of our FOCAL POINT Dialogues in History series. The lecture, “Body, Soul & Subject: A History of Difference in the Early-Modern African Atlantic,” will be delivered by Prof. Herman L. Bennett. Herman L. Bennett is Professor at the Graduate Center at the City University of New York. A scholar […]

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FOCAL POINT Dialogues in History Webinar III: Racial Capitalism and Liberalism

Building on the collective knowledge shared in the two previous webinars, the History Department’s Colloquium Committee warmly invites you to attend the third and final session of our FOCAL POINT Dialogues in History series.  Inspired by the History Department’s Statement on the George Floyd Uprising and its invocation to understand and interrogate our racialized past and the investments of disciplinary history within […]

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ISRRAR Event–Dr. Maytha Alhassen, “The Ummic Imperative: A Decolonial Approach to Malcolm X’s Islam”

Through an assemblage of multiple archives, Dr. Maytha Alhassen tracks the Malcolm X’s political and spiritual project the last year of his life as he travels across decolonizing geographies. Alhassen contends that undergirding Malcolm X’s Black liberation framework is a praxical commitment to an “ummic imperative.” Engaging Malcolm’s spiritual political philosophies will also serve to interrogate and complicate Third World […]

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FOCAL POINT Dialogues in History Webinar II: Empire and Liberation

Building on the collective knowledge shared in our first webinar, the History Department’s Colloquium Committee warmly invites you to attend the second session of our FOCAL POINT Dialogues in History series.  Inspired by the History Department’s Statement on the George Floyd Uprising and its invocation to understand and interrogate our racialized past and the investments of disciplinary history within it, the series […]

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ISRRAR Event–Dr. Samiha Rahman, “Redefining Black Excellence: Ihsan, Islamic Education, and the Tijani Sufi Order”

Since the 1980s, hundreds of predominantly working-class African American Muslim youth have migrated to the West African Tijani Sufi town of Medina Baye, Senegal. They hope to circumvent the antiblackness, Islamophobia, and economic inequality they face in the U.S. in search of a transformative educational encounter in a society where Blackness and Islam constitute the dominant norms. This talk chronicles […]

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ISRRAR Event–Dr. Rasul Miller, “Black Internationalism and Black Sunni Muslims in America”

During the interwar period, the historic neighborhood of Harlem was home to a thriving Black political scene that included Garveyites, Communists, labor organizers, anticolonial activists, and politicized adherents of various new Black religious congregations. Shaykh Daoud Faisal and Mother Khadijah Faisal, the architects of New York City’s first lasting Black Sunni Muslim community worked as artists, organizers, and propagators of […]

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ISRRAR Event–Dr. Jason Young, “Look for Me in the Whirlwind: Toward an Ecology of Afro-Futurism”

Speaking before a rapt audience, famed black nationalist leader, Marcus Garvey, vowed to support the cause of African liberation not only in life, but also in death, insisting that he would return as an “earthquake, or a cyclone, or plague, or pestilence” to aid in the fight for freedom. He implored his followers: “Look for me in the whirlwind.” Using […]

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ISRRAR Event–Dr. LaKisha Simmons, “The Ancestors and the Womb are One: Black Motherhood and Histories of Black Infant Loss”

Throughout the twentieth century, Black women in the United States experienced at least double the rates of infant mortality experienced by white women. Through an analysis of oral histories collected in the US South in the 1930s, Dr. LaKisha Simmons (University of Michigan) details what Patricia Hill Collins terms a “Black women’s standpoint on mothering.” From interviewees’ discussions of infant […]

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The Initiative for the Study of Race, Religion, and Revolution’s Winter 2021 Schedule

Professor Butch Ware and the ISRRAR announce the Winter Quarter schedule for HIST 210RA: Race, Faith, Revolution. Graduate students are invited to register for this 2-unit seminar and to sign up for the listserv at http://tinyurl.com/ISRRARListServ. How have Black metaphysics articulated with racial politics in order to advance efforts of justice, liberation, and self-actualization? In this very special year of […]

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Nyasha Mboti, “Closing the Loophole: Apartheid Studies”

Professor Mhoze Chikowero invites all to attend a special guest lecture by Dr. Nyashi Mboti as part of UCSB’s African Studies Series. Dr. Mboti will discuss the new field he founded: Apartheid Studies. He will introduce his forthcoming 4-volume treatise on the subject, Apartheid Studies: A Manifesto, which will change how we think about enslavement, colonialism, neocolonialism, impoverishment, and the exploitation and […]

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Azaria Mbughuni, “Tanzania and the Liberation Struggles in Southern Africa”

All are cordially invited to a special guest lecture by Dr. Azaria Mbughuni on the role of Tanzania in Southern Africa’s liberation struggles. Dr. Mbughuni’s guest lecture will build onto Professor Mhoze Chikowero‘s ongoing graduate seminar on African Self-Liberation. Dr. Mbughuni is Assistant Professor of History at Lane College, where he is also the Chair of the Division of Business, […]

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