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February 2020

Grace Peña Delgado, “Mexico’s New Slavery: A Critique of Neo-Abolitionism to Combat Human Trafficking”

February 21, 2020 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
HSSB 4041, University of California Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106 United States

As part of the The Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy‘s Winter Quarter speaker series, Grace Peña Delgado (History, UC Santa Cruz) will present “Mexico’s New Slavery: A Critique of Neo-Abolitionism to Combat Human Trafficking.” Delgado is the author of Making the Chinese American: Global Migration, Localism, and Exclusion in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands (2012) and co-author of Latino Immigrants in the United States (2011). Delgado participates in the Arts and Humanities Research Council’s Project on Trafficking, Smuggling, and Illicit…

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Brandon Seto, “Doctorates Without Borders: Careers in Government, Advocacy, and Communication for PhDs”

February 28, 2020 @ 11:15 am
HSSB 4020, University of California Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106 United States

On February 28, Dr. Brandon Seto, Senior Floor Consultant to California State Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon (and a 2010 UCSB history PhD), will give a talk entitled “Doctorates Without Borders: Careers in Government, Advocacy, and Communication for PhDs,” about employment opportunities outside academia available to holders of PhDs. The talk, which is sponsored by UCSB’s Public History Program, is free and open to the public, and a delicious lunch will be served. All are welcome to attend, and graduate students…

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Sara Beam, “Missing Babies and Tacit Tolerance of Infanticide in Early Modern Europe”

February 28, 2020 @ 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
HSSB 4080, 4080 Humanities and Social Sciences Building, UC Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106 United States

Aggressive criminal prosecution of unwed mothers who killed their newborns in early modern Europe (1550-1750) has led historians to assume that Europe was less tolerant of illegitimacy and infanticide than other pre-modern societies, including China and Japan. New research throws this assumption into question. In early modern Geneva, authorities often turned a blind eye to the untimely deaths and abandonment of unwanted bastards. These findings suggest that Europeans took a more practical approach to managing fertility than we had thought.…

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May 2020

VIRTUAL TALK: Alan Liu, “Friending the Past: The Sense of History in the Digital Age”

May 4, 2020 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
University of California Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106 United States
Flyer for virtual talk for Friending the Past: The Sense of History in the Digital Age on 5/4/21 from 11-12PM

“In Friending the Past, Alan Liu explores how we can learn from the relationship between past societies whose media forms fostered a communal and self-aware sense of history. Interlaced among these inquiries, Liu shows how extensive ‘network archaeologies’ can be constructed as novel ways of thinking about our affiliations with time and with each other.”

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VIRTUAL TALK: Ryan Horne, “Aeolian Alexanders: Coins, Space, and Networks in Ancient Turkey”

May 18, 2020 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
University of California Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106 United States
Flyer for virtual talk for Aeolian Alexanders: Coins, Space, and Networks in Ancient Turkey on 5/18/20 from 11AM-12PM

Ryan Horne (World History Center, University of Pittsburgh), “Aeolian Alexanders: Coins, Space, and Networks in Ancient Turkey”   Date/Time: Monday, May 18 from 11am-12pm PST   Abstract: “An increasing number of historians and sociologists have theorized empires as a series of interlocking networks of social and political interactions. Less attention has been paid to how digital techniques can be deployed to study the structure of those networks, their geospatial context, or their visualization, especially in the construction of maps. Advances…

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“Coronavirus and Historical Patterns of Epidemics in Latin America”

May 22, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
University of California Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106 United States
Flyer for Zoom Talk for Coronavirus and Historical Patterns of Epidemics in Latin America on 5/22/20 from 12-1:30PM

A Zoom Talk by Dr. Marcos Cueto Wednesday, May 13, at 12 pm – 1:30 pm, via Zoom Abstract. Historical studies on epidemics in Latin America have magnified fragilities in public health structures, revealed the vulnerability of the poor and discovered cases of heroism under adversity. They have also identified an historical trend –revived in the contemporary crisis caused by Covid-19– characterized by a reductionism in the explanation of the social factors that sustain epidemics, insufficient and contradictory official responses and…

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September 2020

Free

Stuart Tyson Smith, “Black Pharaohs? Egyptological Bias, Racism, and Egypt and Nubia as African Civilizations”

September 22, 2020 @ 1:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Harvard University Fall 2020 W.E.B. Du Bois Virtual Lecture Series "Black Pharaohs?: Egyptological Bias, Racism, and Egypt and Nubia as African Civilizations" on 9/22/20 at 4PM ET

Harvard University’s Hutchins Center for African & African American Research welcomes UCSB Professor of Anthropology (and History Department affiliate faculty member) Stuart Tyson Smith to the W.E.B. Du Bois Virtual Lecture Series. On Tuesday, September 22 Professor Smith will present his Zoom lecture “Black Pharaohs? Egyptological Bias, Racism, and Egypt and Nubia as African Civilizations.” Register in advance for this free event here. Please note that the lecture begins at 4:00 Eastern/1:00 Pacific time. Professor Smith’s research centers on the civilizations…

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October 2020

Free

John Majewski, Living Democracy in Capitalism’s Shadow: Creative Labor, Black Abolitionists, and the Struggle to End Slavery

October 8, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Black and white drawing of a woman with bonnet thinking about what to write with a quill in her hand

REGISTER NOW Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link In the two decades before the Civil War, a new type of capitalism developed in the northern United States that stressed mass education, widespread innovation, and new markets for art and design. For Black abolitionists, the changing northern economy presented new opportunities to highlight the evils of slavery. While continuing to attack slavery’s physical cruelty, Black abolitionists in the 1840s and 1850s increasingly highlighted the “mental darkness”…

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Free

Lizabeth Cohen, Struggling to Save America’s Cities in the Suburban Age: Urban Renewal Revisited

October 22, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Zoom talk for Struggling to Save America's Cities in the Suburban Age: Urban Renewal Revisited on 10/22 from 4-5PM

Click here to download the flyer for this event. REGISTER NOW Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link Urban Renewal of the 1950s through 1970s has acquired a very poor reputation, much of it deserved. But reducing it to an unchanging story of urban destruction misses some important legacies and genuinely progressive goals. Those include efforts to create more socially mixed communities, to involve suburbs—not just cities—in solving metropolitan inequality, and most importantly, to hold the…

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November 2020

Free

Azaria Mbughuni, “Tanzania and the Liberation Struggles in Southern Africa”

November 12, 2020 @ 11:30 am - 12:30 pm
Zoom, CA
Flyer for Zoom Talk for "Tanzania and the Liberation Struggles in Southern Africa" with Dr. Azaria Mbughuni on 11/12/20 from 11:30-12:30PM

All are cordially invited to a special guest lecture by Dr. Azaria Mbughuni on the role of Tanzania in Southern Africa’s liberation struggles. Dr. Mbughuni’s guest lecture will build onto Professor Mhoze Chikowero‘s ongoing graduate seminar on African Self-Liberation. Dr. Mbughuni is Assistant Professor of History at Lane College, where he is also the Chair of the Division of Business, Social and Behavioral Sciences. Dr. Mbughuni was born in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. He earned his Ph.D. from Howard University. His research…

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Page last modified: November 10, 2020