JOB POSTING: LECTURER IN HISTORY

Job # JPF01193 The Department of History at the University of California, Santa Barbara invites applications for a pool of qualified temporary lecturers to teach a course (or courses) in history for the upcoming openings. The number of positions varies from quarter to quarter and may include Summer terms, depending on the needs of the department. Courses needed may include:  • […]

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In memoriam: Alan Vu
March 1989-February 9, 2018

The History Department faculty and students, along with the staff of HASC, and numerous colleagues from around UCSB, mourn the tragic, untimely death of Alan Vu, our beloved undergraduate advisor. Alan brought sunshine wherever he went, was a major problem solver, and always went the extra mile for students and faculty alike. If there is any consolation in this terrible […]

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HISTORY CLASSES TO TAKE IN SPRING 2018!

With Spring 2018 registration beginning soon, here are some History classes to consider.  And, check out our full Spring 2018 schedule of classes. History 9: Introduction to Historical Methods– Hiroshima in History and Memory MWF 2:00-2:50pm, GIRV 2108. Professor Kate McDonald. How has the atomic bombing of Hiroshima been remembered and commemorated in the United States and Japan? This course […]

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Studies in Late Antiquity– New Issue Now Available.

Studies in Late Antiquity (SLA) is a forum for innovation and reflection on global Late Antiquity (150 – 750 CE) which questions and expands on received models and methods. Primary points of interest include interconnections between the Mediterranean and Africa, Iran, Arabia, the Baltic, Scandinavia, the British Isles, China, India and all of Asia, as well as disrupting the assumed connection […]

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New Study Shows Humanities Majors Financially, Emotionally Well-Off

A new study from the American Academy of Arts & Sciences challenges the myth of the underemployed, unhappy humanities graduate.  The study analyzed data from the U.S. Census and other government sources, plus Gallup polling of workers nationwide.  In contrast to stereotypes about humanities majors, the study reveals that workers with BA degrees in the humanities had a very low unemployment […]

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Graduate student Sergey Saluschev wins research fellowship

Congratulations to Sergey Saluschev, who has been awarded a 2018-2019 research fellowship from the American Councils Title VIII Research Scholar Program.  Funded by the U.S. Department of State’s Program for Research and Training on Eastern Europe and the Independent States of the Former Soviet Union (Title VIII), the American Councils Research Scholar Program provides full support for graduate students, faculty, and independent scholars […]

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Professor Manuel Covo wins Huntington Library Fellowship

Professor Manuel Covo has been awarded a research fellowship at the Huntington Library for the 2018-2019 academic year. During the tenure of the fellowship he will be finishing his first monograph, The Entrepôt of Atlantic Revolutions: Saint Domingue, Commercial Republicanism and the Remaking of the French Empire. This monograph will place the American, French, and Haitian Revolutions within a global context […]

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Professor Barbieri-Low awarded Honorable Mention for Hanan Book Prize

Anthony Barbieri-Low’s co-authored 2 volume work, Law, State and Society in Early Imperial China  (Brill 2015), has been accorded Honorable Mention status in this year’s Patrick D. Hanan Prize for translation from the Association for Asian Studies.  The prize is awarded biennially to an outstanding English translation of a significant work in any genre, from any work from any era that […]

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Professor Juan Cobo Receives UC Humanities Research Institute Award

Professor Juan Cobo Betancourt has won a $15,000 grant from the UC Humanities Research Institute (UCHRI) to support his work on a digital archive of texts from Colonial Latin America.  Prof. Cobo has co-founded a non-profit foundation devoted to digitizing the holdings of endangered archives and libraries in Colombia, making the results available and accesible online for free, and promoting […]

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Professor Erika Rappaport wins award for her A Thirst for Empire

A Thirst for Empire, Professor Rappaport’s recent book on how tea shaped the British empire, has won a Gourmand World Cookbook Awards for the Best Book on Tea in the United States and the World. The Gourmand World Cookbook Awards were founded in 1995 by Edouard Cointreau and are the only international competition that features food writing. Every year, they honor […]

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Professor Emeritus W. Elliot Brownlee appears in Washington Post podcast on tax reform bill

Professor Brownlee, author of Federal Taxation in America: a History and professor of economic history, appeared this week in the “Taxes” episode of the Washington Post podcast Constitutional. In the episode, he and Joseph Fishkin, professor of law at the University of Texas, Austin, discuss the history of the income tax in the United States in light of Congress’s historic tax reform bill. The […]

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Professor Emerita Nancy Gallagher wins mentoring award

Congratulations to Professor Nancy Gallagher, who was awarded with the Middle Eastern Studies Association Mentoring Award last night! The MESA Mentoring Award was established in 1995 and first given at MESA’s 1996 annual meeting. The award recognizes exceptional contributions retired faculty have made to the education and training of others.  

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Professor Brad Bouley publishes new book on the role of autopsy in the canonization process of the 16th and 17th centuries

Professor Bouley’s Pious Postmortems: Anatomy, Sanctity and the Catholic Church in Early Modern Europe explores the complex connection between the spiritual and physical realms in Catholicism by exploring the widespread practice of using autopsies in determining sainthood in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The book, which was featured in the UCSB Current, considers the dozens of examinations performed on reputedly holy corpses in […]

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Professor Miroslava Chavez-Garcia wins article award

Professor Miroslava Chavez-Garcia has received the Bolton-Cutter Prize from the Western History Association for the best article in Spanish Borderlands history for her piece “Migrant Longing, Courtship, and Gendered Identity in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands,” which appeared in the Western Historical Quarterly. Congratulations, Professor Chavez-Garcia!

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Professor Emeritus Tsuyoshi Hasegawa publishes another book on the Russian Revolution

Professor Hasegawa has added to his impressive list of publications The February Revolution, Petrograd, 1917. It is the most comprehensive book on the epic uprising that toppled the tsarist monarchy and ushered in the next stage of the Russian Revolution. Professor Hasegawa presents in detail the intense drama of the nine days of the revolution, including the workers’ strike, soldiers’ revolt, the […]

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Professor Emeritus, Tsuyoshi Hasegawa, publishes book “Crime and Punishment in the Russian Revolution”

Crime and Punishment in the Russian Revolution Mob Justice and Police in Petrograd Tsuyoshi Hasegawa “This book makes a fundamental contribution to our understanding of the Russian Revolution by revealing the violent, chaotic lived experience of the revolution in the capital city. In a narrative full of colorful characters and stories, Hasegawa gives us a street-level view of the collapse […]

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Prof. Miescher wins Mellon Foundation Sawyer Seminar grant

Stephan Miescher, along with Javiera Barandiaran (Global Studies), Mona Damluji (Film and Media Studies), David Pellow (Environmental Studies), and Janet Walker (Film and Media Studies) has been awarded, by the Andrew F. Mellon Foundation, a yearlong grant to support a Sawyer Seminar on “Energy Justice in Global Perspective” for the 2018-19 academic year. Sawyer Seminars aim to engage productive scholars […]

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Job Posting: Assistant Professor in Modern South Asia, c. 1500 to the Present

Job #JPF01087 About: The Department of History at the University of California, Santa Barbara invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professorship in Modern South Asian history, c. 1500-Present. Appointment begins July 1, 2018. The minimum requirement to be considered an applicant is to have either a PhD at time of appointment or to have completed all requirements for a PhD in History […]

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New book by Sarah Case on southern women’s education

Secondary-level female education played a foundational role in reshaping women’s identity in the New South. In Leaders of Their Race: Educating Black and White Women in the New South, Sarah H. Case examines the transformative processes involved at two Georgia schools–one in Atlanta for African American girls and young women, the other in Athens and attended by young white women […]

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UCSB History professors publish four new books during summer 2017!

In addition to Prof. Kate McDonald’s first book, a study on travel in imperial Japan, and Prof. Hal Drake’s examination of miracles in the fourth century Roman empire, summer and fall 2017 will see the publication of Prof. Erika Rappaport’s  A Thirst for Empire: How Tea Shaped the Modern World and Prof. Toshi Hasegawa’s Crime and Punishment in the Russian Revolution: Mob […]

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Prof. Drake publishes A Century of Miracles: Christians, Pagans, Jews, and the Supernatural, 312-410

Professor Drake’s new book offers a fresh examination of a complex polytheistic period in Roman history, surveying a wide range of faiths and belief systems during this eventful century. It offers a thoroughly researched assessment of the supernatural and its sociological and cultural effects on history down to the present. Contemporary readers engaged in religious discourse will find the analysis […]

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New book by Prof. McDonald!

We are happy to announce that Prof. Kate McDonald’s new book, Placing Empire: Travel and the Social Imagination in Imperial Japan is now available in paperback and ebook from UC Press. Placing Empire examines the spatial politics of Japanese imperialism through a study of Japanese travel and tourism to Korea, Manchuria, and Taiwan between the late nineteenth century and the […]

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Prof. Chikowero writes on Music and Politics in Zimbabwe

Prof. Mhoze Chikowero is a featured correspondent in the June 20, 2017 issue of The Herald, Zimbabwe’s largest daily newspaper.  Click here to read Prof. Chikowero’s essay on Cde Dickson “Chinx” Chingaira, a leading Chimurenga (“liberation” in the Shona language) musician and veteran of Zimbabwe’s liberation struggle.  The essay draws from Prof. Chikowero’s recent book, African Music, Power, and Being […]

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Professors Castillo-Muñoz, Farmer, and Seikaly Celebrate New Books

UCSB History professors Verónica Castillo-Muñoz, Sherene Seikaly, and Sharon Farmer celebrate their new books with Chancellor Henry Yang. Prof. Castillo-Muñoz has just published The Other California: Land, Identity and Politics on the Mexican Borderlands with the University of California Press. Prof. Seikaly recently published Men of Capital: Scarcity and Economy in Mandate Palestine (Stanford University Press, 2016). Prof. Farmer recently published […]

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UCSB History Students Garner Five 2017 Commencement Awards

 Paola De La Cruz Paola de la Cruz, a History of Public Policy major, has received the Thomas More Storke Award for Excellence, which is the campus’s highest student honor for outstanding scholarship and extraordinary service to the university, its students, and the community. Paola is completing a senior thesis that examines the history of the Ventura School for Girls, […]

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UCSB at WAWH 2017!

April 27-29th marked the 49th annual conference of the Western Association of Women Historians in San Diego. UCSB was extremely well represented at the conference, with more than a dozen historians on the program! In addition to those pictured, 5 other UCSB students and professors were at WAWH 2017: Professor Veronica Castillo-Munoz, Professor Miroslava Chávez-García, Professor Carol Lansing, Laura Hooton, and Susan […]

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History Is Not a Useless Major: Fighting Myths with Data

Perspectives on History, the news magazine of the American Historical Association, recently published findings on the job outcomes of students who graduated with an undergraduate degree in history, titled “History is Not a Useless Major“. Contrary to popular myths, history majors are not underemployed or paid less than graduates in other fields. The article concludes, “Majoring in history does not doom […]

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New journal goes live! Studies in Late Antiquity

Issue 1.1 of Studies in Late Antiquity went live on 23 February 2017. UC Press publishes the new multidisciplinary journal with a focus on global late antiquity. UCSB professor Beth DePalma Digeser is Editor-in-Chief, and Graduate Student Lisa Meyers is Editorial Assistant. Associate Editors include UC faculty, Emily Albu (Davis), Ra’anan Boustan (UCLA), Susanna Elm (Berkeley), Michele Salzman (Riverside) and Ed […]

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History Lead TA, Melissa Barthelemy, highlighted in The Bottom Line

The most recent TA Spotlight published in campus paper, The Bottom Line, highlights Lead TA Melissa Barthelemy and her work inside and outside of the classroom at UCSB. Barthelemy has been very active in events commemorating the Isla Vista Shootings of 2014 and central to efforts on campus to promote love and care in the wake of this tragedy. Congrats, Melissa, on […]

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“A Workable Future”: Alumna Anne Petersen, Director of the SB Trust for Historic Preservation, featured in the UCSB Current

From The Current: UC Santa Barbara’s Public History Ph.D. program, the nation’s first, prepares students for careers outside academia   (Santa Barbara, Calif.) — Anne Petersen realized as an undergraduate that for her, a career in history would be best experienced outside of a classroom. It was her second summer in college, and she was a volunteer at the Jackson Hole […]

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Job Posting: Summer Lecturer in History

Background in addition to the formal job announcement below: Most positions are for 4 lecture days per week over 6 weeks, either in session A (June 26-Aug. 4) or session B (Aug. 7-Sept. 15). [see Summer sessions calendar] Applicants should note in their cover letter whether they would be willing to relocate to Santa Barbara for a relatively short 6-week […]

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Job Posting: Lecturer in History

Job #: JPF00938 About: The Department of History at the University of California, Santa Barbara, invites applications for temporary, part-time lecturer positions for the 2017-18 academic year. Courses needed may include: • World History Survey, (pre-history to 1000 CE; 1000-1700 CE; 1700 CE to Present) • Western Civilization Survey, (1050-1715 CE; 1715 to Present) • The American People (US survey, all […]

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American Historical Association Condemns Executive Order Restricting Entry into the United States

AHA Condemns Executive Order Restricting Entry to the United States January 30, 2017   The American Historical Association strongly condemns the executive order issued by President Donald J. Trump on January 27 purportedly “protecting the nation from foreign terrorist entry into the United States.” Historians look first to evidence: deaths from terrorism in the United States in the last fifteen […]

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UC statement on President Trump’s executive order

President Janet Napolitano and the Chancellors of the University of California on Jan. 29 issued the following statement: We are deeply concerned by the recent executive order that restricts the ability of our students, faculty, staff, and other members of the UC community from certain countries from being able to enter or return to the United States. While maintaining the […]

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Professor Emeritus Elliot Brownlee interviewed by Parisian journal on President Trump’s tax policies

Professor Emeritus Elliot Brownlee gave an interview to the Parisian newspaper Liberation on what to expect from President Trump’s tax and fiscal policies (the interview is in French). During the month of January, 2017, Professor Brownlee holds a position as directeur d’études invité at the internationally acclaimed Ecole des hautes études en sciences sociales, where he is giving a series of […]

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14 Black Classicists, Exhibit AD&A Museum Jan 14- Apr 30, 2017

The Art, Design, and Architecture Museum opens a new exhibit, “14 Black Classicists.” The exhibit opens Saturday, January 14th and runs through April 30th, 2017. Shortly after the Civil War, a cadre of African-American classicists earned doctorates and taught Greek and Latin at the university and college level. The installation was created by Professor Michele Ronnick of Wayne State University, and […]

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New Book by Verónica Castillo-Muñoz

Dr. Verónica Castillo-Muñoz has just published, The Other California: Land, Identity and Politics on the Mexican Borderlands with the University of California Press. The Other California is the story of working-class communities and how they constituted the racially and ethnically diverse landscape of Baja California. Packed with new and transformative stories, the book examines the interplay of land reform and migratory labor on […]

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New Book Co-edited by Prof. Elena Aronova

A collection of essays co-edited by Prof. Elena Aronova titled Science Studies during the Cold War and Beyond: Paradigms Defected, has recently been published. This book – a contribution to the history of science during the Cold War-  explores the emergence of the field known as “science studies.” One of the main contributions of the collection – which Aronova co-edited with Simone Turchetti from the […]

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Prof. Farmer’s new monograph on The Silk Industries of Medieval Paris

Sharon Farmer’s latest monograph, The Silk Industries of Medieval Paris: Artisanal Migration, Technological Innovation and Gendered Experience, appeared in print at the beginning of Nov., 2016. Drawing on the evidence of tax assessments, aristocratic account books, and guild statutes, the book, published by the University of Pennsylvania Press, explores the economic and technological contributions that Mediterranean immigrants made to medieval […]

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UCSB Alum Wins 2016 Davis Prize from History of Science Society

UCSB alum Jacob Darwin Hamblin is the most recent winner of the Watson and Helen Miles Davis Prize from the History of Science Society. The prize – awarded for the best book published in the history of science and written for the general public –  was for his 2013 Arming Mother Nature: The Birth of Catastrophic Environmentalism. Hamblin did his […]

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NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS-“Transnationalisms, Transgressions, Translations,” The 12th Annual Conference of the International Federation for Research on Women’s History

The 12th Conference of the International Federation for Research on Women’s History/ Federation Internationale Pour la Recherche en Histoire des Femmes (IFRWH/FIRHF) will be held August 12-15, 2018 at the University of California, Santa Barbara, USA, the home of the current President, Eileen Boris. This will be the first time that this international gathering of historians of women and gender […]

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New York Museum Features Work of Prof. Pat Cohen

Professor Pat Cohen’s 1998 book, The Murder of Helen Jewett, is taking on a new life next month in New York City. Helen Jewett will be featured as part of the first permanent exhibit at The Museum of the City of New York, New York at its Core . This exhibit features the stories of compelling persons and objects that helped make New York what […]

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History Professors Investigate Borderlands Around the Globe

UCSB History professors Verónica Castillo-Muñoz, Elizabeth Digeser, Ann Plane, and Gabriela Soto-Laveaga have chapters in a new edited volume, Globalizing Borderlands Studies in Europe and North America, just published by University of Nebraska Press. The volume was edited by UCSB professor John W.I. Lee and professor Michael North of the University of Greifswald, Germany.  Professor North was a Fulbright Distinguished […]

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New Book by Prof. Salim Yaqub Examines American & Arab Relations

Cornell University Press recently published Professor Salim Yaqub’s new book, Imperfect Strangers: Americans, Arabs, and U.S.–Middle East Relations in the 1970s. Yaqub’s book argues that the 1970s were a pivotal decade in U.S.-Arab relations—a time when Americans and Arabs became an inescapable presence in each other’s lives and perceptions, and when each society came to feel profoundly vulnerable to the […]

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Welcome to our new graduate students of 2016!

Pictured: Professor Alice O’Connor, Chris MacMahon, Chloe Roberts, Mika Thornburg, Avian Johnson (tall), Julia Crisler, Sharon Farmer, Nora Kassner, Elizabeth Schmidt, Moriah Ulinskas, Darcy Ritzau, Rhiannon Parisse (not pictured: Neil Johnson, Sandy Governder, and Lei Dou). Welcome!

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UCSB History PhD Wins Book Award

Congratulations to this year’s winner of the Phi Alpha Theta Best First Book Award, Dr. Mateo M. Farzaneh, for The Iranian Constitutional Revolution and the Clerical Leadership of Khurasani. Dr. Farzaneh is an Associate Professor of History of the Islamic World and the Modern Middle East at Northeastern Illinois University-Chicago. Dr. Farzaneh’s PhD is from UC Santa Barbara, where he studied […]

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Echoes of the Past: Grover Cleveland on UCSB’s The Current

A bitter election. Social unrest and violence at home and abroad that seem to augur ruinous times. A gaping political divide fed in part by new technology and ways to communicate. Sound familiar? Welcome to the 19th century. While the hyper-partisanship of today’s America might feel new, two UC Santa Barbara scholars note that we’ve been down this road before. […]

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UCSB History PhD Alumna Wins Prestigious SHEAR Book Prize

April Haynes (UCSB History PhD 2009) has won the 2016 SHEAR (Society for the History of the Early American Republic) book prize for her 2015 monograph, Riotous Flesh: Women, Physiology and the Solitary Vice in 19th-Century America (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2015). “Riotous Flesh …sets a new standard for how to study together black and white female reformers while […]

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History Undergraduate Receives Chancellor’s Award for Research Contributions

Three graduating seniors, including one History major, have been recognized for their outstanding contributions to undergraduate research at UC Santa Barbara. The Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Research for 2016 has been awarded to Charles Joseph Key, who has earned a bachelor of arts degree in History, as well as two other undergraduates from different disciplines. Under the mentorship […]

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Professor Seikaly Wins Prestigious Plous Award from UCSB’s Academic Senate

Professor Sherene Seikaly has won this year’s prestigious Plous Award from UCSB’s Academic Senate. Established in 1957, and named after Harold J. Plous, an Assistant Professor in UCSB’s Department of Economics, the Plous Award is presented annually to: an Assistant Professor from the College of Letters and Science. Selection is based on outstanding performance and promise as measured by creative action […]

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Graduating UCSB History Major Awarded the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Research

Graduating UCSB History Major CJ Key has been awarded the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Research for his Senior Honors Thesis, “Dogwhistle Disarmament: A History of Racialized Gun Control in 20th Century America.” CJ is the fourth History Major to win the award in the past six years. No other department on campus can boast of such a winning streak!

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Professor Rappaport and Professor Yaqub Receive Teaching Awards from UCSB’s Academic Senate

The following are the transcripts from the Academic Senate’s recent awards ceremony during which Professor Erika Rappaport and Professor Salim Yaqub received their distinguished teaching awards. Professor Rappaport joined the Department of History at UCSB in 1997, and teaches British and British Empire history. Her teaching philosophy is to “encourage students to take charge of their own education, to see themselves […]

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Professor Majewski Appointed Dean of Humanities and Fine Arts at UCSB

John Majewski

Professor John Majewski (19th century American History) has been appointed as Dean of Humanities and Fine Arts here at UCSB! The following is the message Chancellor Henry T. Yang sent out to the campus community earlier today: Dear Members of our Campus Community, It is my great pleasure to announce the appointment of Professor John Majewski as Dean of Humanities […]

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Fellowships, Jobs, and Promotions for UCSB History PhDs

Here’s the latest on fellowships, jobs, and promotions for UCSB History graduate students and alumni/ae. Check back frequently for new updates!   POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS Sarah Watkins (Ph.D. 2014; currently Visiting Assistant Professor at Colby College, Maine) has won a Junior Faculty Fellowship at the Center for Historical Research, Ohio State University, on the theme “Family, Kinship, and Households: New Perspectives,” for […]

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History Graduation Reception 2016 for all graduating History majors and their families

All graduating History majors and their families are invited! The UCSB Department of History is pleased to invite you to the annual UC Santa Barbara History Department Graduation Reception. Sunday June 12th 10:00am -12:00pm in HSSB 4020 Please join History faculty members and your fellow students for a buffet breakfast and mingling. This celebration is for all graduates of the 2015-2016 […]

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UCSB History PhD Wins Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship

Matthew Avery Sutton

Matthew Avery Sutton — who received his PhD in History at UCSB in 2005 — has been awarded a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship for the 2016-2017 academic year. His Guggenheim Fellowship will support his current project, a book tentatively entitled FDR’s Army of Faith: Religion and Espionage in World War II, to be published by Basic Books. This project looks at the roles […]

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James F. Brooks’ New Monograph Gets Reviewed by Slate

Mesa of Sorrows book cover

“Just before a chilly dawn in the autumn of 1700, shadowy figures slipped into the Hopi town of Awat’ovi through a gate that could only have been left unguarded by one of its own citizens. The invaders proceeded to kill most of the adults they found, thrusting burning torches and crushed red peppers into the kivas—underground ceremonial chambers—where the men […]

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New Honors and Awards for UCSB History Faculty

Recently, a number of faculty members in the History Department have received awards and honors from various professional organizations and on-campus entities. Join us in congratulating the following faculty members for their well-deserved recognition: Sarah Cline: Was awarded the Edward Lieuwen Award for Lifetime Achievement in Teaching Latin American Studies by the members of the Rocky Mountain Council for Latin American […]

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Former UCSB Public History Doctoral Student Is Named Executive Director for the Santa Barbara Trust for Historic Preservation

Anne Petersen

The Board of Directors for the Santa Barbara Trust for Historic Preservation (SBTHP) announced today that Anne Petersen, Ph.D. has been appointed as their new Executive Director. The search for the new leader for SBTHP was national and included candidates from the Santa Barbara region and across the country.  Petersen’s first day on the job will be April 1. “We […]

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Prof. Kalman quoted in New Yorker article on history of filibustering Supreme Court nominees

As the political jockeying about replacing Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia begins, LBJ’s experience trying to nominate Justice Abe Fortas as Chief Justice in an election year offers a historical parallel. This Feb. 13, 2016 New Yorker article “The Death of Antonin Scalia” quotes Prof. Kalman, who wrote a biography of Fortas: “Abe Fortas and L.B.J. are spinning in their […]

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Professor Mhoze Chikowero Publishes New Book on Music, Colonialism and Self-liberation: “African Music, Power, and Being in Colonial Zimbabwe”

"African Music, Power, and Being in Colonial Zimbabwe" book cover

Professor Mhoze Chikowero‘s new book, African Music, Power, and Being in Colonial Zimbabwe, reveals the role of music in the subjugation and liberation of African culture. “It’s not just a book about music,” Chikowero said. “It’s more of a history through music. As a historian I’m interested in archives, I’m interested in sources, I’m interested in how we can use […]

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CfP: Gender and Intimacy Across the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands: A Workshop at UC Santa Barbara

Gender and Intimacy Across the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands A Workshop at UC Santa Barbara September 30 – October 1, 2016 Loma Pelona Conference Center SCHEDULE Friday, September 30, 2016 5:00-5:15 pm: Welcome & Introduction, Sharon Farmer, Chair & Professor, History 5:15-6:00 pm: Keynote Speaker, Dr. Alexandra M. Stern, Professor of American Culture, Women’s Studies, History, and Obstetrics and Gynecology at the […]

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Professor James F. Brooks Publishes New Book, Mesa of Sorrows: A History of the Awat’ovi Massacre

Mesa of Sorrows book cover

The Hopi community of Awat’ovi existed peacefully on Arizona’s Antelope Mesa for generations until one bleak morning in the fall of 1700—raiders from nearby Hopi villages descended on Awat’ovi, slaughtering their neighboring men, women, and children. While little of the pueblo itself remains, five centuries of history lie beneath the low rises of sandstone masonry, and theories about the events […]

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Professor Sherene Seikaly Publishes New Book, “Men of Capital: Scarcity and Economy in Mandate Palestine”

Men of Capital examines British-ruled Palestine in the 1930s and 1940s through a focus on economy. In a departure from the expected histories of Palestine, this book illuminates dynamic class constructions that aimed to shape a pan-Arab utopia in terms of free trade, profit accumulation, and private property. And in so doing, it positions Palestine and Palestinians in the larger […]

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Seikaly and Colleagues on Palestine and Black America

Sherene Seikaly

Professor Sherene Seikaly is among the scholars, activists, and other notables who have created a short video, “When I See Them, I See Us.”  The video examines the similarities (and to some extent the differences) between the situation and activism of African Americans and of Palestinians, and declares a level of solidarity between the two groups’ struggles. Professor Seikaly says […]

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Ancient Chinese Historian Anthony Barbieri-Low Experiments with Innovative Teaching Techniques during Summer Session B

Professor Barbieri-Low’s HIST 2A conducts the Wittfogel experiment

While teaching World History (History 2A) during the last few years, I have been experimenting with various historical games or simulations that might make the study of the ancient world more memorable. Some of these ideas were originated by my TA’s during our History 500 (TA workshop) sessions, and others I brainstormed over of last couple years by myself or […]

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UC President’s Faculty Research Fellowships Awarded to Profs. Keel and McDonald

Christian Thought and Racial Science, and Travel in Imperial Japan are their topics. The Religious Pursuit of Race: Christian Thought and the Development of Modern Racial Science With this fellowship Dr. Keel will complete his first book The Religious Pursuit of Race: Christian Thought and the Development of Modern Racial Science, which is currently under contract with Stanford University Press. […]

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“Spring Insight” for prospective students held on April 11th

Students and their families visited the History Dept. table to learn about studying History at UCSB. On Saturday, April 11, the History Department’s information table at the Spring Insight Open House offered information and advice about the History major at UCSB. Why study history at UCSB instead of at another UC campus? Besides the obvious advantages of our climate and […]

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Santa Barbara (& UCSB) History

UCSB Visitors: Looking to learn a little about our fair city? Here are some links to get started. Santa Barbara is a very special place. If you’re new to the area (or thinking of coming here), what better way to get to know the present-day city than through its past? This News item offers links to websites on local history […]

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January 2015 Historia Newsletter Now Online

Alumni and supporter newsletter features in-depth articles about department news & events This issue’s news includes features on: — Adam Sabra named Cleveland Dodge Professor (p. 1) — Lectures on Slavery and Justice (p. 1) — Sixth annual Badash lecture (p. 2) — Thoughts on the department by the late Bob Kelley (p. 3) — Making a game of history […]

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Faculty, Alumni and Grad Student Publications, Placements and Awards (Updated April 2016)

Recent books, articles, awards & achievements of UCSB historians UCSB Historians keep busy publishing new and innovative historical research. Here are the most recent titles, awards and achievements, listed alphabetically by author.   2016 Updates: POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS Sarah Watkins (Ph.D. 2014; currently Visiting Assistant Professor at Colby College, Maine) has won a Junior Faculty Fellowship at the Center for Historical Research, […]

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Prof. Méndez wins prize for her book on the formation of the Peruvian State

It was voted no. 1 of 2014 publications by leading scholars of Peruvian history Prof. Cecilia Méndez’s book La República Plebeya: Huanta y la formación del Estado Peruano, 1820-1850 (Lima: Instituto de Estudios Peruanos, 2014)[The Plebeian Republic: The Huanta Rebellion and the Making of the Peruvian State, 1820–1850], was voted “the best book of history of 2014” in a survey […]

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