Personal Statement:

I study the social, cultural, religious and legal history of Egypt and Lebanon from the late Ottoman period into the twentieth century. My current project examines the global dimensions of the religious encounters between Anglo-American missionaries and their co-religionists in Egypt during the interwar period with a focus on the networks established through philanthropic societies and ecumenical organizations.

In addition to my academic work, I also write on religious minorities in the Middle East, American policy in the region, and diasporic Arab communities.

Selected Publications:

“Assessing Coptic Reform Through the International Christian Student Movement,” Coptic Canadian History Project, October 2018.

“Syria’s Christians Reckon with Survival,” Sojourners, June 2018.

“Pence’s Empty Promises to Christians in the Middle East,” Yale Journal of International Affairs, 13 (Spring 2018), 77-80.

“Targeted Yet Faithful: Egypt’s Copts, Wary of Restrictions, Celebrate Virgin Mary Feast,” Sojourners, October 2017.

“From the Cedars to the Frontlines: Danbury’s Greater Syrian Immigrants and the Great War,” Connecticut History Review Journal, 55 (2) (Fall 2016), 140-152.

“The Armenian-Syrian Relief Fund in World War l-Era Connecticut,” Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project, Fall 2016.

Awards & Professional Activities:

  • University of California, Santa Barbara History Department Fellowship Award, Fall 2018
  • Yale Center for Race, Indigenous, and Transnational Migration Research Fellowship, Cairo, Summer 2017
  • Foreign Languages and Area Studies Fellowship Finalist (FLAS) in Arabic at Yale University, Summer 2017
  • Critical Languages Scholarship (CLS) in Arabic, Noor Majan Institute in Ibri, Oman, Summer 2017
  • Oral History Fellowship,Yale University, Fall 2016
  • Foreign Languages and Area Studies Fellowship (FLAS), Arabic Language Institute in Fez, Morocco, Summer 2016