UCSB Hist 33d, Fall 2005 (course homepage)
Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Holocaust

Prof. Marcuse (homepage)
marcuse@history.ucsb.edu

Hist 33D: Web Project Details
(pdf version for printing)
(see also original Web Project Assignment, and the Projects Index page)

Timeline

  • In order to qualify for the web option (otherwise you must take the final exam), you must:
  1. have received a check+ on your latest draft,
  2. make all corrections and carefully proofread the final version that draft,
  3. make a (group) appointment to see me on Mon., Tue. or Wed., Dec. 5-7 (times on sign-up sheet)
  4. Make the recommended corrections and resubmit the printed revision with my comments, with an electronic copy in microsoft word .doc or .rtf format, at my office by Monday, December 5, 11am.
    The electronic copy can be e-mailed or on a disk (I will return your diskódo write your name on it).
  5. If you would like to include any images, these must be mailed/saved as separate files (do not just insert them into the word document). However, indicate on the printout where they should be inserted.

Project Elements

Your final submission must have the following elements (see also the blue Web Project handout):
  1. A title for your overall group project (if you are in a group), and of your individual contribution, followed by your name and the date. If possible, include one iconic image that can be at the top of the web page.
  2. An about the author sentence or paragraph, in which you describe: yourself (major, class year, relevant interests), and the extent of your knowledge of German/European history (e.g. personal/family connections, previous coursework, travel). You might also say why you chose this particular book or topic.
    Example: I am a junior political science major who has been studying the formation of political parties. I traveled through Germany after I graduated from high school, and I have visited the Holocaust museum in Washington. I chose to write about the genocide in Nigeria because I am interested in human rights issues.
  3. A short introduction (abstract) of your project (about 150-200 words), in which you briefly describe what your project is about, and state or your main thesis (the main point they/you are trying to make).
  4. The body text of your project. Please do not use underlining, only bold and italics (underlining will be for links only).
  5. At the end you should have a sources section, with the full bibliographic information for the sources you found. It should include at least two other books, journal articles, or web sites on your topic (with the full link). They must be annotated.

prepared for web on12/3/05; last updated: 1/26/06
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