UCSB Hist 233AB, Spring-Fall 2003
Seminar in Modern German History
HSSB 3202, Fridays, 10-1
www.history.ucsb.edu/faculty/marcuse/

Prof. Marcuse (Courses page; homepage)
HSSB 4221, 893-2635
marcuse@history.ucsb.edu
2003 Office hours: Tue. 12:30-1:30, Wed. 11-12

Seminar in Modern German History
Course Syllabus

This two-quarter graduate research seminar provides graduate students an opportunity to conduct primary and secondary research on a topic in 19th or 20th century German history, ultimately producing an article-length paper on that topic. Emphasis is on techniques of researching, writing, editing and presentation. A research seminar paper should be conceived so that it can become a published article or a chapter in a Ph.D. thesis.

Recommended Books [for 2003 to be replaced by selected readings; from 1995 syllabus]

  • Jacques Barzun and Henry Graf, The Modern Researcher (Harcourt, Brace, 5th ed. 1985): for questions of research procedure, methodology and organization.
  • Joseph Williams, Style: Toward Clarity and Grace (Univ. of Chicago, 1990), 226 pages. beyond "Strunk & White;" writing clearly and "elegantly," $9.95. (amazon $8.50)
  • For an excellent article about oral presentations, see: Sam Wineburg, "Keeping Their Eyes Open... Must It Be This Way? Ten Rules for Keeping Your Audience Awake During Conferences" (2 page pdf). Educational Researcher, Vol. 33 No. 4 (from http://www.aera.net).
  • sample paper from 2003 class (revised and expanded, 2005): Bonnie Harris, "Cantor Joseph Cysner: From Zbaszyn to Manila"
Class list
Name Tel. e-mail Topic
Laurence xxx-xxxx @ Environmental movement in 19th c. Germany
Joe x @ Reception of Erwin Rommel, 1933-1970s
Bonnie x @ Cysner Odyssey from Germany to Philippines
Jim x @ unfinished

Schedule of Class Meetings

1.

4 Apr.

introduction: questions & topics, sources, preliminary searching

2.

11 Apr.

descriptive list of 5 potential topics due; library visit (or internet databases)

3.

18 Apr.

discussion/narrowing down of topics; start bibliographic work

4.

25 Apr.

preliminary bibliography and draft prospectus due; selection of sample articles

5.

2 May

individual consultations [start reading Williams; research articles]

6.

9 May

refined prospectus due; group discussion of problems; discussion of sample articles

7.

16 May

annotated bibliography due; individual consultations

8.

23 May

revised prospectus with bibliographic essay due: exchange for peer critique

9.

30 May

final prospectuses with bibliographic essay/annotated bibliography

10.

6 June

oral presentations

 

 

[readings for 2nd quarter will be modified for Fall 2003]

1.

4 Oct.

administrative meeting; progress reports

2.

11 Oct.

outline and thesis paper due; Barzun chaps. 5-9

3.

18 Oct.

Gavriel Rosenfeld in JCH 29(1995), 95-128; Barzun pp. 387ff.

4.

25 Oct.

1st installment due (10pp); Barzun chaps. 10-13

5.

1 Nov.

postmodern methodology debate; individual consultations (re: 1st installment)

6.

8 Nov.

2nd installment due (+10pp); Williams chaps. 1-5

7.

15 Nov.

3rd installment due (+10pp); Williams chaps. 6-10

8.

20 Nov. (Tue)

exchange for peer critiques

9.

30 Nov.

oral presentations; Barzun 14,15

10.

7 Dec.

oral resentations

 

12 Dec.

final draft due


prepared for web on 4/16/03 by H. Marcuse, update 2/10/05, formatting 3/25/05
back to top, to Courses page, Grads page, to H. Marcuse homepage