# Title Days Time Location Instructor
2A World History  (Prehistory to 1000CE)

This course surveys the early cultural, social, economic, and political development of Africa, the Americas, Asia, the Mediterranean, and Oceania, from prehistory to 1000 CE.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture and Thought
European Traditions
Writing

MW 3:30-4:45pm PSYCH 1924 Wolpo  
2B World History (1000 CE to 1700 CE)

Survey of the peoples, cultures, and social, economic, and political systems that have characterized the world’s major civilizations in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Oceania. 1000 CE to 1700 CE.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture and Thought
European Traditions
Writing

MW 11:00-12:15pm IV THEA Hough  
2A World History  (Prehistory to 1000CE)

This course surveys the early cultural, social, economic, and political development of Africa, the Americas, Asia, the Mediterranean, and Oceania, from prehistory to 1000 CE.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture and Thought
European Traditions
Writing

WF 2:00-3:15pm TD-W 1701 Digeser  
4B Western Civilization (1050-1715CE)

General survey courses, designed to acquaint the student with major developments that have influenced the course of western civilization from 1050 CE to 1715 CE. These developments are as likely to be in religion, the arts, and sciences as in the more traditional political field. Weekly discussion sections are an important feature of this course, enabling the student to develop and expand upon material presented during the lecture hour.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture and Thought
European Traditions
Writing

TR 12:30-1:45pm BUCH 1910 Lansing  
8 Introduction to History of Latin America

Deals with major issues in Latin America’s historical formation: pre-Hispanic cultures, the Spanish conquest, the role of colonial institutions, the development of trade, eighteenth-century reform, independence, the formation of nations; and identify major issues in current Latin American affairs.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture and Thought
Writing

MW 5:00-6:15pm BRDA 1610 Méndez Gastelumendi  
9 Historical Investigations: Methods and Skills

Through studying a particular topic in history, students gain insight into historical methods and skills. Course designed for freshmen and sophomore history majors or prospective majors. Others may enroll by permission of instructor. Topics vary by quarter and instructor.This course introduces students to the method of  historical analysis through a study of how the atomic bombing of Hiroshima has been remembered and commemorated in the United States and Japan. We examine the history and memory of the bombing through film, literature, and photographs, as well as academic and public history writing, with particular attention to problems of evidence, interpretation, and narrative. A final project will ask students to produce their own public history of the bombing and to analyze why they chose to remember the event in that particular way.

TR 2:00-3:15pm PHELP 1440 McDonald  
17B The American People (Crisis to Progressivism)

A survey of the leading issues in American life from the sectional crisis to progressivism. The course focuses on politics, cultural development, social conflict, economic life, foreign policy, and influential ideas. Features discussion sections.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area D: Social Science
American History and Institutions
Writing

MWF 10:00-10:50am MUSIC LLCH Jacobson  
49B Survey of African History

An introduction to the history of Africa from 1800 CE to the present. Course themes include: organization of production, state formation, Africa and the world economy, colonialism, resistance, power and identities in African societies, current struggles and conflicts.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture and Thought
World Cultures
Writing

TR 5:00-6:15pm LSB 1001 Miescher  
87 Japanese History Through Art and Literature

A basic introduction to the history of Japanese culture from its origins to the present day, with particular emphasis on the evidence of architecture and painting (presented through audiovisual modules). Selectedexamples of fiction and poetry will also be used.

MW 2:00-3:15pm CHEM 1171 McDonald  
102MN Special Topics: European Empires

The Colonial Empires of Spain, Portugal, Britain and France have long been in the focus of historical research and teaching in the US. In contrast, the empires within Europe have been largely ignored. This course will concentrate on the Holy Roman Empire, the Swedish Empire, the Polish-Lithuanian Empire, and the Russian Empire, which collectively dominated European history both in the Early Modern Period and in modern times. We will focus specifically on the political cultures of these Empires and their impact on European cultures.

 

TR 12:30-1:45pm ARTS 1356 North  
102LH Special Topics-The History of the North American Borderlands

This course will discuss the history of North America and its peoples from 1700 to the present by discussing relationships across and through borders, including locations such as the mainland United States, Hawai’i, Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, and United States Territories such as Guam, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, and the US Virgin Islands. This course will discuss themes and topics such as the creation of political, economic, and social systems and ties on a national, transnational, and international scale, as well as imperialism, racism, identity formation, NAFTA, colonialism, and globalization

MW 12:30-1:45pm HSSB 4201 Hooton  
104A Science and Religion: Conflict or Collaboration?

Broad historical survey of the dynamic relationship shared between science and religion across Europe and America. Topics include the philosophy of science, the religious implications of the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, evolutionary theory, climate change, stem-cell research, and neurosciences.

TR 11:00-12:15pm ARTS 1349 Keel  
106R Undergraduate Research Seminar in History in Science, Technology, and Medicine

Undergraduate research seminar on a diverse range of topics in science, technology, and medicine. Varied topics addressed: defining a research problem, identifying an original topic, conducting research, citing sources, and presenting results. Students will conduct historical research in a seminar context, using both primary and secondary source materials, to produce an original and substantial research paper. Intensive writing required.

W 9:00-11:50am HSSB 4080 Keel  
107D Visionary Biology

Examines how major biological concepts—from evolution to biotechnology—inspired the visions of humanity’s future, as well as the understanding of life and society.

MWF 11:00-11:50am PHELP 2536 Aronova  
109T Technology in Modern American History

Surveys social history of technology in American life with attention to 19th and 20th centuries. Focuses on history of U.S. industrialization, the place of innovation in U.S. history, and role of technology in intellectual, political, and social life.

MWF 8:00-8:50am ARTS 1353 McCray  
111B History of Greece

Archaic and Classical Greece, 750 BCE to 323 BCE.

MW 5:00-6:15pm GIRV 1116 Kegerreis  
121D Crime and Punishment in Early Modern Europe

Examines the varying judicial systems of early modern Europe and looks at how crime and criminals were defined and treated in a social, religious, and political context. Topics will also include beggars, violence, heretics, and witches.

TR 9:30-10:45am GIRV 1112 Bernstein  
129B Europe in the Seventeenth Century

Economic, social, political, and intellectual history of the seventeenth century: 1648-1685.

MW 2:00-3:15pm HSSB 4020 Sonnino  
130 Slavery in the Premodern World

Emphasizing slavery’s persistence in the Middle Ages, this course explores the experiences of captives, slaves, and serfs, as well as eunuchs, concubines and slave-soldiers (mamluks) in Western Europe, Byzantium and the Islamic World from 500-1500.

TR 12:30-1:45pm GIRV 1112 Blumenthal  
132R Undergraduate Research Seminar in War & Society Since 1789

Research seminar in topics in war, the state and society since 1789. Origins and consequences of wars, and the political, social, and economic aspects of both land and sea warfare. Students will conduct historical research in a seminar context, using both primary and secondary source materials, to produce an original and substantial research paper. Topics addressed: defining a research problem, identifying on original topic, conducting research, citing sources, and presenting results. Intensive writing required.

R 1:00-3:50pm HSSB 4020 Talbott  
140B Early Modern Britain

A history of England from the late Middle Ages to the eighteenth century.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Writing

TR 2:00-3:15pm GIRV 1116 McGee  
142AL American Legal & Constitutional History

The U.S. Supreme Court has weighed in on the nation’s most significant social questions ranging from segregation, to same-sex marriage & women’s work. This course is designed to put these & other decisions in proper context. It will introduce students to U.S. legal history from the founding period to the present. With special attention to the evolution of legal conceptions of property, race & gender, civil rights, & criminal justice. Students must read critically & make arguments based on evidence.

TR 11:00-12:15pm ARTS 1353 Perrone  
146T History of Israel/Palestine

History of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Course themes include evolution of Zionism, Palestine before World War I, and the British mandate, World War II, the Arab- Israeli wars, rise of Palestinian nationalism, and Israeli and Palestinian societies today.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
World Cultures

MW 3:30-4:45pm ARTS 1349 Seikaly  
147R Undergraduate Research Seminar in African History

A seminar on a topic in African history. A research paper is required.

T 10:00-12:50pm HSSB 4080 Chikowero  
148A Pre-Colonial Southern Africa  

Explores the major socio-economic and political history of the Southern African region from around 1000 CE to the 1880s. Focuses on state making, economic systems, regional mobilities and international connections through trade before the advent of European colonialism.

MW 9:30-10:45am HSSB 4020 Chikowero  
151A Latin American History

A general survey of the social, economic, institutional, and intellectual history of colonial Spanish America (1492-1800), with comparisons to colonial Brazil.

MWF 9:00-9:50am GIRV 1115 Cobo  
159C Women in Twentieth Century American History

A continuation of History 159B to the present.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area D: Social Science
American History and Institutions
Writing

MWF 9:00-9:50am BUCH 1920 Case  
164IB American Immigration

U.S. immigration history from the eighteenth to twentieth century. Examines forces that brought people from various parts of the globe to the U.S., their experiences in migrating and in subsequent generations, and enduring racial and ethnic hierarchies.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
American History and Institutions
Ethnicity
Writing

 

TR 8:00-9:15am ARTS 1353 Garcia, Ph.D.  
168B History of the Chicanos  

The history of the Chicanos, 1821 to the present; traces the social-cultural lifeline of the Mexicans who have lived north of Mexico.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area D: Social Science
American History and Institutions
Ethnicity

MW 2:00-3:15pm ARTS 1349 Castillo-Munoz  
171ME The United States and the Middle East Since 1900

Analysis of developments in US involvement in the Middle East since 1900. Formation and execution of US foreign policy toward the region: interaction between US foreign and domestic affairs; perceptions and actions of nations and peoples of the Middle East.

TR 3:30-4:45pm TD-W 1701 Yaqub  
176B The American West

The American West as a frontier and as a region, in transit from the Atlantic seaboard to the Pacific, and from the seventeenth century to the present.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
American History and Institutions

Same course as ANTH 176B

TR 9:30-10:45am WEBB 1100 Brooks  
177 History of California

California as a case study of national trends, and as a unique setting with its special problems and culture.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
American History and Institutions

MW 3:30-4:45pm BUCH 1920 Graves  
179A Native American History to 1838

A lecture course on the history of the indigenous peoples of North America from European contact to Cherokee removal. The course stresses comparative cultural responses to European colonization and from American history from a native point of view.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
American History & Institutions
Ethnicity
Writing

 

M 6:00-8:50pm NH 1111 Warkentin  
194BH Senior Honors Seminar

Students taking part in departmental honors program will write a senior thesis on a research topic of suitable depth under close supervision of faculty mentors.

T 1:00-3:50pm HSSB 4020 Bernstein  
195IA Public Policy Senior Thesis

A two-quarter individual research project, under the direction of a history professor selected with the advice of the departmental adviser to public policy students.

T 3:00-5:50pm HSSB 4080 O'Connor  
197MC Special Topics-History of the French Empire

Situates modern French history in an imperial context, looking at France from the perspective of the regions that were colonized. We will start with the first settlements in the Americas, analyze the emergence of a second empire in Africa and Asia and end with postcolonial immigration to European France. Themes to be explored include slavery, state formation, race, republicanism, capitalism, and national identity.

TR 3:30-4:45pm ARTS 1349 Covo  
197CW Special Topics-Women of Color and Social Movements in the U.S.

This course explores the diverse experiences of U.S. women of color in their struggles for social justice and human dignity in the face of gender, sexual, racial, ethnic, and class oppression in the twentieth century. The class pays special attention to the social movements of the 1960s and 1970s and the intersections among those efforts led by and composed of African American, Chicana/Latina, Native American, and Asian American, transgender and queer women.

TR 12:30-1:45pm ARTS 1353 Chavez-Garcia  
200AS Historical Literature: Asia

A reading course in a general area of history, specifically designed to prepare M.A. candidates for their comprehensive examination fields, but also appropriate for Ph.D. students seeking broad preparation. Introduces the student to the sources, historiography, and general literature of the field in question.

T 1:00-3:50pm HSSB 3030 Zheng  
200E Historical Literature: Europe

A reading course in a general area of history specifically designed to prepare M.A. candidates for their comprehensive examination fields, but also appropriate for Ph.D. students seeking broad preparation. Introduces the student to the sources, historiography, and general literature of the field in question.

R 9:00 - 11:50am HSSB 4041 Rappaport  
201E Advanced Historical Literature: Europe -Cultural History of Early Modern Europe

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. (Usually offered quarterly.)

This reading seminar provides an overview of the development of European cultural history in the early modern period from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. The reading will focus on court culture and patronage, cultural markets and cultural exchanges that constituted early modern Europe. We will read Peter Burke, James van Horn Melton, Jürgen Habermas, Tim Blanning and Michael North

W 11:00 - 1:50pm HSSB 3030 North  
201E Advanced Historical Literature: Europe

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. (Usually offered quarterly.)

F 4:00-6:50pm HSSB 4041 English  
201E Advanced Historical Literature: Europe (Reception History & Collective Memory)

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. (Usually offered quarterly.)

The title of this course offering is: Reception History and Collective Memory.

R 9:00-11:50am HSSB 4041 Marcuse  
201ME Advanced Historical Literature–Middle East

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. ME. Middle East.

T 10:00am-12:50pm HSSB 4080 Seikaly  
202 Historical Methods

A general introduction to selected historiographical issues and historical methods. (F)

W 6:00-8:50PM HSSB 4041 Miescher  
203A Seminar in Comparitive History

Research seminar in selected issues in comparative history. Such topics might include urban history, history of religion, slavery, family, gender systems, and consumer societies. Themes vary with instructor.

W 2:00-4:50PM HSSB 4041 Spickard  
215B Seminar in Medieval History

A two-quarter course.

M 2:00-4:50pm HSSB 4041 Blumenthal  
223B Seminar in Modern European History

A research seminar in selected topics in the history of Europe, 1815 to the present.

T 1:00-3:50pm HSSB 4041 Edgar  
250A Foundations of Latin American History

Seminar introduces the important issues, themes, and literature in Latin American history during the colonial period.

T 4:00-6:50pm HSSB 4041 Cobo  
267A Seminar in American Economic History

Seminar in American Economic History.

T 9:00-11:50am HSSB 4041 Lichtenstein  
287J Reinventing “Japan” Colloquium  

This year long interdisciplinary colloquium brings together graduate students who study Japanese history and culture. It introduces current scholarship on Japan via readings, discussions and presentations by visiting scholars, UCSB scholars and graduate students. The colloquium meets bi- weekly. Students will prepare readings for discussion, write a seminar-length paper and present their paper to the colloquium once during the year.

W 4:00-5:00pm HSSB 4080 Saltzman-Li
291 Theoretical Perspectives on War, Nationalism, Political Violence, and State-Making

This three-quarter colloquium will discuss key works on war, political violence, nationalism, and state-making from an interdisciplinary perspective and a wide geographical and chronological scope. Readings will include both classic and more recent works, and may vary each year. The colloquium will also encourage and support student research on these areas. Students will be evaluated by their class participation and written work, just as in a regular graduate seminar The colloquium will occasionally invite guest speakers.

TBD TBD TBD Méndez Gastelumendi  
292B Foundations of U.S. History, 1846 to 1917

A colloquium introducing the important issues, themes and literature in the history of the United States, from 1846 to 1917. Historiographical in nature the course assumes a basic familiarity with the period.

R 1:00-3:50pm HSSB 4041 Furner  
294 Colloquium in Work, Labor, and Political Economy

Hosts leading scholars of the nineteenth- and twentieth-century U.S. whose work touches upon the history and character of work, employment, labor, poverty, race, ethnicity, political economy, and public policy. The colloquium meets three to four times per quarter.

F 1:00-3:50pm HSSB 4041 Lichtenstein  
295 Workshop in Environmental History

Writing workshop, professionalization seminar, and guest lecture series for graduate students working in area of environmental history. Meets monthly throughout the academic year, and includes occasional campus events and field trips.

R 6:00-8:50pm BREN 4316 Alagona  
295TS Workshop in the History of Technology and Science

Writing/reading workshop, professionalization seminar, and guest lecture series for graduate students working in area of history of science/technology. Meets monthly throughout the academic year.

TBD TBD TBD Aronova