# Title Days Time Location
2B World History (1000 CE to 1700 CE)

Survey of the peoples, cultures, and social, economic, and political systems that have characterized the world’s major civilizations in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Oceania. 1000 CE to 1700 CE.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture and Thought
European Traditions
Writing

4B Western Civilization (1050-1715CE)

General survey courses, designed to acquaint the student with major developments that have influenced the course of western civilization from 1050 CE to 1715 CE. These developments are as likely to be in religion, the arts, and sciences as in the more traditional political field. Weekly discussion sections are an important feature of this course, enabling the student to develop and expand upon material presented during the lecture hour.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture and Thought
European Traditions
Writing

8 Introduction to History of Latin America

Deals with major issues in Latin America’s historical formation: pre-Hispanic cultures, the Spanish conquest, the role of colonial institutions, the development of trade, eighteenth-century reform, independence, the formation of nations; and identify major issues in current Latin American affairs.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture and Thought
Writing

17B American Legal & Constitutional History

A survey of the leading issues in American life from the sectional crisis to progressivism. The course focuses on politics, cultural development, social conflict, economic life, foreign policy, and influential ideas. Features discussion sections.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area D: Social Science
American History and Institutions
Writing

20 Science, Technology, and Medicine in Modern Society

Explores how science, technology and/or medicine have helped shape modern societies (roughly 1850-present). Themes include formation of scientific and technical communities, the interactions of science with political and popular culture, and the social context of knowledge production.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture and Thought

49A Survey of African History

An introduction to the history of Africa from prehistory to the 1800 CE. Course themes include: organization of production, state formation, Africa and the world economy, colonialism, resistance, and power and identities in African societies.

Enrollment Comments: Same course as Black Studies 49A. Not open for credit to students who have completed History 49.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture and Thought
World Cultures
Writing

80 East Asian Civilization (cross-listed with EACS 80)

A basic introduction to the history of East Asia focusing on the emergence and evolution of Chinese civilization and its impact upon the distinctive indigenous cultures of Japan, Korea, and Vietnam.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture and Thought
World Cultures
Writing

99 Introduction to Research
Students must have an overall GPA average of 3.0. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 units, but only 4 units may be applied toward the major. Students are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined.
Independent research under the guidance of a faculty member. Exceptional students are offered an opportunity to undertake independent or collaborative research or to act as interns for faculty-directed research projects.
100H Historical Writing

Intermediate-level honors seminar in which students read and critique major primary and secondary works from a variety of periods and regions.

101G Comparative Histories of Same-Sex Practices and Gender Variance

Exploration of same-sex behavior in ancient Greek, pre-modern Oceania, medieval Europe, modern Africa, and North America. Introduction to the theoretical questions in the study of sexuality and how scholars have used these tools.

102MN Special Topics
104SS Race, Science and Society
105CW Science and Technology in the Cold War  

Examines history of science and technology during the Cold War, with primary focus on the United States. Topics examined include: science/state relationship, arms race, the military-industrial-academic complex, Big Science, government secrecy, McCarthyism, the space race, environmentalism.

111Q Readings in Greek History

Undergraduate reading seminar on ancient Greek history. Topics may vary from quarter to quarter

115B The Worlds of Renaissance Italy, 1300-1500

Explores the overlapping worlds of Renaissance Italy, 1300-1500: the vibrant merchant culture; the elegant courts of princes; intellectual circles like the Platonic Academy; famed mercenary captains and their troops; the underworld of male same sex relations, of criminality and prostitution; the lives of women in marriages, in convents and in poorhouses; the workshops and homes of the laboring poor. One central theme is the culture of patronage and the production of extraordinary art.

117C Women, The Family, and Sexuality in the Middle Ages

Family structure; perceptions and ideals of intimate and familial relations; status, perceptions, and experiences of women in Western Europe c. 400-1400 A.D. Special attention on social, political, and religious contexts.

Enrollment Comments: Same course as Feminist Studies 117C and Medieval Studies 100A.

 

127A The History of the French Empire

“Liberty, equality, fraternity”: what does this revolutionary motto mean from a colonial perspective? France, often characterized as “the country of human rights,” also has a long imperial history that sheds light on key contradictions of modernity: democracy and populism, citizenship and inequality, colorblindness and racism. Countries as different as Canada, Haiti, Algeria, Vietnam, Senegal, India and even the United States share a common French colonial past: how did these French roots of globalization define the world as we know it?

129D Europe in the Eighteenth Century

Economic, social, political, and intellectual history of the eighteenth century. 1715 to 1763.

135C History of Russia

1917 to present. A history of the Soviet Union from the Russian Revolution of 1917 to its collapse, focusing on political and social history.

140B Early Modern Britain

A history of England from the late Middle Ages to the eighteenth century.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Writing

141B Twentieth Century Britain

Culture, society, and politics in Britain since 1914. Topics include the impact of war on society, the economy and empire; the welfare state and changing roles of women, consumer and youth cultures; the new left and new right.

145A The Middle East I: From the Origins of Islam to the Year 1000

The rise of a world religion and the emergence of a new multi-ethnic society under its aegis, the evolution of social and political institutions within the Universal caliphate, the creation of a specifically Islamic culture and intellectual life.

146 History of the Modern Middle East

Through a critical engagement with colonialism, nationalism, and modernity this course explores the social, economic, political, and cultural histories of the Middle East from 1750 to the present.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
World Cultures

146R Undergraduate Research Seminar in Middle Eastern History

Through readings and discussion, students will explore a broad problem or topic in the history of the Middle East or wider Islamic world. The course will culminate with a research paper or historiographical review essay.

146T History of Israel/Palestine

History of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Course themes include evolution of Zionism, Palestine before World War I, and the British mandate, World War II, the Arab- Israeli wars, rise of Palestinian nationalism, and Israeli and Palestinian societies today.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
World Cultures

159B Women in American History (cross-listed with FEM ST 159B)

Social history of women in America from 1800 to 1900. Changing marriage, reproduction and work patterns, and cultural values about the female role. Attention to racial, class and ethnic differences. Analysis of feminist thought and the several women’s movements.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area D: Social Science
American History and Institutions
Writing

161B Colonial and Revolutionary America

A social and political history of colonial and revolutionary America from the mid-eighteenth century to 1800, with emphasis on the interaction of Native Americans, Europeans, and African Americans. The course will combine lectures with discussion of both primary and secondary sources.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area D: Social Science
American History and Institutions
Ethnicity

161R Undergraduate Research Seminar in Early American History

Students will conduct historical research in early American history in a seminar context. An original and substantial research paper is required.

Recommended Preparation: History 9 and WRIT 109HU

166B United States in the Twentieth Century

Political, cultural, social, and economic development of the United States from 1930 to 1959.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
American History and Institutions

166R Undergraduate Research Seminar in 20th Century U.S. History

A undergraduate research seminar on US history designed to guide students in doing research. Each student will produce a substantial research paper on some aspect of American politics and/or culture since 1900.

168B History of the Chicanos

The history of the Chicanos, 1821 to the present; traces the social-cultural lifeline of the Mexicans who have lived north of Mexico.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area D: Social Science
American History and Institutions
Ethnicity

168CR Undergraduate Research Seminar in Chicano History

Studies in selected aspects of Chicano history and the United States-Mexico borderlands with an emphasis on social and economic history.

168N Interracial Intimacy

Historical, sociological, and psychological exploration of several interconnecting phenomena, including interracial and interethnic romance and marriage, and changing identities and social positions of multicultural and multiethnic individuals. Concentrates mainly on the United States, with selected international comparisons.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Ethnicity
Writing

171C The United States and the World, 1898-1945

Analysis of developments in foreign affairs in first half of twentieth century. Formation and execution of foreign policy, interaction between foreign and domestic affairs.

175B American Cultural History

Examines how race, ethnicity, and class have shaped changing attitudes toward and experiences of sex roles, sexuality, child rearing, work patterns, and relationships among men, women, and children. Also explores changing conceptions of the state’s role in family life.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area D: Social Science
American History and Institutions

175D American Family History

Examines how race, ethnicity, and class have shaped changing attitudes toward and experiences of sex roles, sexuality, child rearing, work patterns, and relationships among men, women, and children. Also explores changing conceptions of the state’s role in family life.

177 History of California

California as a case study of national trends, and as a unique setting with its special problems and culture.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
American History and Institutions

179B Native American History, 1838 to the Present

A lecture course on the history of the indigenous peoples of North America from Cherokee removal to the present. The course stresses native history, relations with the U.S. Government and offers American history from a native point of view.

192 Public History

Topical history course to explore the field of public history. Course explores preservation, government, media, historical societies and museums, archives, and teaching of public history. Emphasis on field surveys and case studies.

193R Undergraduate Research Seminar in Food in World History

Research seminar that explores the impact of economic, cultural, and geopolitical change on food and drink in world history (19th century to present). Attention given to the changing social, cultural, and political meanings of food. Geographical emphases will vary depending on the instructor. Students will conduct historical research in a seminar context, using both primary and secondary source materials, to produce an original and substantial research paper.

Recommended Preparation: HIST 9 or WRIT 109HU

194BH Senior Honors Seminar
 A 2-quarter in-progress sequence course with grades for both quarters issued upon completion of History 194BH. Only 4 of the 8 units may be applied toward the major. Same course as Medieval Studies 194BH.
Students taking part in departmental honors program will write a senior thesis on a research topic of suitable depth under close supervision of faculty mentors.
Recommended Preparation: Writing 109HU.
195IA Senior Thesis
A two-quarter individual research project, under the direction of a history professor selected with the advice of the departmental adviser to public policy students.
199 Independent Studies
Students must have a 3.0 GPA for preceding 3 quarters and are limited to 5 units/qtr and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined. Must be a major in History or present justification to instructorand department for diverting from norm. No more than 8 units of History 199 may be applied to the majors in History or History of Public Policy.
The description of any one 199 must not be identical to any existing course description.
199RA Independent Research Assistance
Students must have a minimum 3.0 grade-point average for preceding three quarters and are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined.
Faculty supervised research. Written work is usually required.
200AS Historical Literature: Asia (ONLY HIIST)

A reading course in a general area of history, specifically designed to prepare M.A. candidates for their comprehensive examination fields, but also appropriate for Ph.D. students seeking broad preparation. Introduces the student to the sources, historiography, and general literature of the field in question.

201AS Advanced Historical Literature: Asia

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. (Usually offered quarterly.)
Held concurrently with HIST 185CQ

201E Advanced Historical Literature — Europe  

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. (Usually offered quarterly.)

201RE Advanced Historical Literature — Race and Ethnicity

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. RE. Race and Ethnicity

201AM Advanced Historical Literature

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. AM. America.

Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit. Open to both M.A. and Ph.D. candidates.

 

204H Human and Post-Human Ontologies

Students will come to understand how theological, scientific, and political beliefs about non-human objects, animals, and racial others have constructed our inherited beliefs about what it means to be human. We’ll explore the formation of the anthropos in Euro-American intellectual history through the work of Aristotle, Aquinas, Ockham, Alfred Russell, Charles Darwin, Nietzsche among others. Our study will be informed by theoretical work on the meaning of modernity, post-humanism, liberalism, inter-species ethnography, animal sacrifice, disability studies, critical race theory, conceptual problems in evolutionary biology, & the work of Sylvia Wynter, Bruno Latour, Donna Haraway.

209A The Academic Profession of History

This course provides students with the practical knowledge needed for obtaining an academic position, develops skills for effective teaching, and prepares students to deal with funding agencies, publishers, employers, and professional organizations.

215B Seminar in Medieval History

A two-quarter course.

253A Special Seminar in Latin American History

Discussion meetings for postgraduates. Reading, research, and writing in the history of Latin America in subject of student’s choice.

266A Research Seminar in Recent U.S. History

A research seminar for graduate students interested in any aspect of recent U.S. history.

277A Topics in the History of Science
Research seminar selected from such topics as Babylonian astronomy, Greek science, Age of Newton, rise of modern physics, scientific instruments, nationalism/internationalism in science, science and society, sociology of science, public conceptions of science, organization and profession of science. (Offered periodically.)
292B Foundations of U.S. History, 1846 to 1917
A colloquium introducing the important issues, themes and literature in the history of the United States, from 1846 to 1917. Historiographical in nature the course assumes a basic familiarity with the period.
294 Colloquium in Work, Labor, and Political Economy

Hosts leading scholars of the nineteenth- and twentieth-century U.S. whose work touches upon the history and character of work, employment, labor, poverty, race, ethnicity, political economy, and public policy. The colloquium meets three to four times per quarter.

295TS Workshop in the History of Science and Technology

Writing/reading workshop, professionalization seminar, and guest lecture series for graduate students working in area of history of science/technology. Meets monthly throughout the academic year.

295 Workshop in Environmental History

Writing workshop, professionalization seminar, and guest lecture series for graduate students working in area of environmental history. Meets monthly throughout the academic year, and includes occasional campus events and field trips.