# Title Days Time Location Instructor
2C World History (1700CE-Present)

Survey of the peoples, cultures, and social, economic, and political systems that have characterized the world’s major civilizations in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Oceania. 1700 CE to present.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture and Thought
European Traditions
Writing

MW 3:30-4:45pm IV THEA Spickard  
4C Western Civilization (1715CE-Present)

General survey courses, designed to acquaint the student with major developments that have influenced the course of western civilization from 1715 CE to present. These developments are as likely to be in religion, the arts, and sciences as in the more traditional political field. Weekly discussion sections are an important feature of this course, enabling the student to develop and expand upon material presented during the lecture hour.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture and Thought
European Traditions
Writing

TR 2:00-3:15 IV THEA Edgar  
9 Historical Investigations: Methods and Skills

Through studying a particular topic in history, students gain insight into historical methods and skills. Course designed for freshmen and sophomore history majors or prospective majors. Others may enroll by permission of instructor. Topics vary by quarter and instructor.

MW 2:00-3:15 GIRV 2119 Blumenthal  
9 Historical Investigations: Methods and Skills Copy

Through studying a particular topic in history, students gain insight into historical methods and skills. Course designed for freshmen and sophomore history majors or prospective majors. Others may enroll by permission of instructor. Topics vary by quarter and instructor.

MW 2:00-3:15 GIRV 2119 Blumenthal  
17C The American People (WWI-Present)

A survey of the leading issues in American life from World War I to the present. The course focuses on politics, cultural development, social conflict, economic life, foreign policy, and influential ideas. Features discussion sections.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area D: Social Science
American History and Institutions
Writing

TR 3:30-4:45pm IV THEA Yaqub  
46MI Modern Iran

Modern Iranian history from the 1906 Constitutional Revolution to the 1979 Islamic Revolution and the post- revolutionary years. Shi’i Islam, the rise of nationalism, the quest for modernization, democracy and authoritarianism, and imperialism and politics of oil.

Same course as RG ST 81.

TR 12:30-1:45 CHEM 1171 Afary  
80 East Asian Civilization (Xlisted EACS 80)

A basic introduction to the history of East Asia focusing on the emergence and evolution of Chinese civilization and its impact upon the distinctive indigenous cultures of Japan, Korea, and Vietnam.

Satisfies General Education Requirements: Area E: Culture and Thought World Cultures Writing

MW 9:30-10:45 TD-W 1701 Ji  
101WR Undergraduate Research Seminar in World History

An undergraduate research seminar in World history. Topics will vary based on the instructor. Students will conduct historical research in a seminar context, using both primary and secondary source materials, to produce an original and substantial research paper

W 1:00-3:50 HSSB 4020 Miescher  
105CW Science and Technology in the Cold War

Examines the evolving relationships between science and Cold War geopolitics through key episodes from the natural as well as social sciences on both sides of the ideological divide.Topics examined include: science/state relationship, arms race, the military-industrial-academic complex, Big Science, government secrecy, the space race, environmentalism.

TR 2:00-3:15 GIRV 1112 Aronova  
112D The Roman World in Late Antiquity

A survey of the process by which the late Roman Empire divided into three chief cultural, religious, and political entities (Byzantine, Germanic, and Islamic) between the fifth and eighth centuries.

WF 9:30-10:45 ARTS 1356 Digeser  
117E Society and Nature in the Middle Ages

Human-environmental interaction from the fall of Rome to environmental and epidemiological disasters of the fourteenth century. Topics include agricultural impact on the environment, introduction of new animal species to northern Europe, and selective breeding of livestock and plant life.

TR 12:30-1:45 ARTS 1353 Farmer  
121R Undergraduate Research Seminar in Early Modern Europe

A seminar in early modern European history, 1450-1700. Students develop research skills and use them to complete a research topic of their choice in early modern European history. Emphases will vary with instructor and offering.

M 1:00-3:50 HSSB 4080 McGee  
124A Women, Gender, and Sexuality in Europe, 1750-1914 (Xlisted FEM ST 124A)

The roles of women, gender, and sexuality in eighteenth and nineteenth century Europe. Exploration of the nature of women and revolution: religious, legal, scientific, and popular conceptions of gender and sexuality; industrialization and family life, the rise of organized feminism.

MW 9:30-10:45 PHELP 3505 Rappaport  
133D The Nazi Holocaust and Other Genocides

The Nazi campaign of ethnic purification through eugenics and mass murder can be considered a watershed event in European history. This course examines the factors that combined to result in the Nazi genocides, as well as the contexts, causes and consequences of other modern genocides.

Satisfies General Education Requirements: Area E: Culture and Thought European Traditions

TR 2:00-3:15 TD-W 1701 Marcuse  
133Q Readings in Holocaust History
M 10:00 - 12:50pm HSSB 4080 Marcuse  
142S Slavery and the Creation of African America: 1550-1861

Why is slavery America’s “peculiar institution”? This course seeks to answer this question by addressing two interrelated themes: the development of slavery as an institution, and the rise of African American culture and society in what is now the United States. We will explore these themes by turning to both primary sources and historical monographs, and examining slavery from a variety of perspectives. These include, but are not limited to, law, custom, labor, political economy, and gender.

MWF 11:00-11:50 ARTS 1349 Perrone  
144B Social and Cultural History of the U.S. – Mexico Border

Examines the social and cultural construction of the United States and Mexico border.

TR 9:30-10:45 BUCH 1930 Chavez-Garcia  
145C The Middle East III: Early Modern Empires and Transformations, 1500-1800

A survey of Middle Eastern history from the rise of the Safavid Empire in Iran and the Ottoman conquest of the Mamluk Empire until the French occupation of Egypt and the first Ottoman attempts at modernizing reform.

TR 11:00-12:15 ARTS 1353 Sabra  
150CL Comparative Colonialism and Language

All colonial projects had to face the problem of linguistic differences, but the ways in which they did so were far from uniform and are very revealing of their different ambitions, ideological foundations, and local circumstances. Explores the history of colonialism comparatively from the perspective of language, from the early modern period to the twentieth century, in Latin America, Africa, and Southeast Asia.

MW 9:30-10:45 PHELP 1425 Cobo  
159R Undergraduate Research Seminar in Women’s History

Research seminar on the history of women in America. Topics addressed: defining a research problem, identifying an original topic, conducting research, citing sources, and presenting results. Intensive writing required. Students will conduct historical research in a seminar context, using both primary and secondary source materials, to produce an original and substantial research paper.

M 9:00-11:50 HSSB 4020 Case  
164MR Undergraduate Research Seminar in the History of America’s Racial Minorities

Introduction to recent trends on race and ethnicity in U.S. history focusing on methodology and historiography. Examination and evaluation of research strategies and theoretical frameworks of selected historical literature on America’s racial minorities and how these processes interface with other historical processes. Students will conduct historical research in a seminar context, using both primary and secondary source materials, to produce an original and substantial research paper.

M 12:00-2:50 HSSB 3041 Chavez-Garcia  
166B United States in the Twentieth Century, 1930-1959

Political, cultural, social, and economic development of the United States from 1930 to 1959.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
American History and Institutions

TR 3:30-4:45 TD-W 1701 Lichtenstein  
167Q Labor Studies Internship Research Seminar

Readings and assignments assist students in using historical/social science methods to develop a 20-page research paper on some aspect of their internship.

R 9:00-11:50 HSSB 4020 Halvorsen  
179B Native American History, 1838 to the Present

A lecture course on the history of the indigenous peoples of North America from Cherokee removal to the present. The course stresses native history, relations with the U.S. Government and offers American history from a native point of view.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
American History & Institutions
Ethnicity

M 3:00-5:50 GIRV 2115 Black, Liza
185B Modern China Since 1911 (Xlisted CHIN 185B)

The fall of the dynastic system, the revolution against traditional values, the rise of the Nationalist Party, the challenge from the Communists, the founding of the People’s Republic, and the Post-Mao reform, focusing on the theme of revolution.

Satisfies General Education Requirements:
Area E: Culture and Thought
World Cultures
Writing

MW 2:00-3:15 SH 1430 Zheng  
187S The Samurai

The samurai of Japan were a hereditary military class that evolved over a millennium. Course traces this history and clarifies the range of differences that separated samurai in each era as their roles and ideologies changed.

TR 3:30-4:45 EMBAR HALL Roberts  
193AW Revolts and Revolutions in the Atlantic World (1750-1830)

Examines the age of revolution from a global perspective. We will look beyond national narratives to discuss citizenship, republicanism, slavery and colonialism and bring together histories of resistance in Europe, Africa and the Americas.

WF 9:30-10:45 HSSB 4020 Covo  
200AS Advanced Historical Literature: Asia

A reading course in a general area of history, specifically designed to prepare M.A. candidates for their comprehensive examination fields, but also appropriate for Ph.D. students seeking broad preparation. Introduces the student to the sources, historiography, and general literature of the field in question.

M 9:00-10:50 HSSB 4041 McDonald  
201E Advanced Historical Literature: Europe

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. (Usually offered quarterly.)

R 10:00-12:50 HSSB 4041 Covo  
201E Advanced Historical Literature: Europe

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. (Usually offered quarterly.)

F 1:00-3:50 HSSB 3001E Digeser  
201AM Advanced Historical Literature: America

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. (Usually offered quarterly.)

M 2:00-4:50pm HSSB 4020 Perrone  
201E Advanced Historical Literature: Europe (Diplomatics/Codicology)

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. (Usually offered quarterly.)

English  
201HT Advanced Historical Literature: History of Technology

This graduate level readings seminar provides a survey of key works in the history of technology. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field. Written work as prescribed by the instructor.

F 10:00-12:50 HSSB 4041 McCray  
201WD Advanced Historical Literature: World

A reading course in a field of the professor’s specialty. Introduces the student to the sources and literature of the field in question. Written work as prescribed by the instructor. (Usually offered quarterly.)

M 12:00-2:50 HSSB 4041 Hancock  
203B Seminar in Comparative History

Research seminar in selected issues in comparative history. Such topics might include urban history, history of religion, slavery, family, gender systems, and consumer societies. Themes vary with instructor.

W 9:00-11:50 HSSB 4041 Spickard  
204 Research Workshop

Practicum in the writing and critiquing of specialized research papers in all fields of history. May be repeated for credit. May qualify by petition for graduate research seminar credit when combined with a History 201 seminar in which the student has developed a research proposal for this course.

T 2:00-4:50 HSSB 4041 McGee  
213B Seminar in Roman History

Selected topics in the history of the Roman Republic and Empire, with particular emphasis on problems of the later Roman Empire.

TBD TBD TBD Digeser  
267B Seminar in American Economic History

Seminar in American economic history.

T 9:00-11:50 HSSB 4041 Lichtenstein  
287J Reinventing “Japan” Colloquium  

This year long interdisciplinary colloquium brings together graduate students who study Japanese history and culture. It introduces current scholarship on Japan via readings, discussions and presentations by visiting scholars, UCSB scholars and graduate students. The colloquium meets bi- weekly. Students will prepare readings for discussion, write a seminar-length paper and present their paper to the colloquium once during the year.

W 4:00-5:00pm HSSB 4080 Saltzman-Li
291 Theoretical Perspectives on War, Nationalism, Political Violence, and State-Making

This three-quarter colloquium will discuss key works on war, political violence, nationalism, and state-making from an interdisciplinary perspective and a wide geographical and chronological scope. Readings will include both classic and more recent works, and may vary each year. The colloquium will also encourage and support student research on these areas. Students will be evaluated by their class participation and written work, just as in a regular graduate seminar The colloquium will occasionally invite guest speaker

F 3:00-5:50 HSSB 4020 Méndez Gastelumendi  
292C Foundations of U.S. History 1917-Present

A colloquium introducing the important issues, themes, and literature in the history of the United States, from 1917 to the present. Historiographical in nature, the course assumes a basic familiarity with the period.

W 1:00-3:50 HSSB 4041 Yaqub  
294 Colloquium in Work, Labor, and Political Economy

Hosts leading scholars of the nineteenth- and twentieth-century U.S. whose work touches upon the history and character of work, employment, labor, poverty, race, ethnicity, political economy, and public policy. The colloquium meets three to four times per quarter.

F 1:00-3:50pm HSSB 4041 Lichtenstein  
295 Workshop in Environmental History

Writing workshop, professionalization seminar, and guest lecture series for graduate students working in area of environmental history. Meets monthly throughout the academic year, and includes occasional campus events and field trips.

R 6:00-8:50pm BREN 4316 Alagona  
295TS Workshop in the History of Technology and Science

Writing/reading workshop, professionalization seminar, and guest lecture series for graduate students working in area of history of science/technology. Meets monthly throughout the academic year.

TBD TBD TBD Aronova